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Berycidae

provided by wikipedia EN

Berycidae is a small family of deep-sea fishes, related to the squirrelfishes. The family includes the alfonsinos and the nannygais.

Berycids are found in both temperate and tropical waters around the world, between 10 and 1,300 m (33 and 4,265 ft) in depth, though mainly greater than 100 m (330 ft). They are typically red in colour, and measure up to 1 m (3.3 ft) in length.[2] Distinguishing features include spiny scales and large eyes and mouths.[3]

References

  1. ^ Froese, Rainer, and Daniel Pauly, eds. (2012). "Berycidae" in FishBase. October 2012 version.
  2. ^ Froese, Rainer and Pauly, Daniel, eds. (2017). Species of Beryx in FishBase. January 2017 version.
  3. ^ Paxton, John R. (1998). Paxton, J.R.; Eschmeyer, W.N. (eds.). Encyclopedia of Fishes. San Diego: Academic Press. p. 161. ISBN 0-12-547665-5.
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Berycidae: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Berycidae is a small family of deep-sea fishes, related to the squirrelfishes. The family includes the alfonsinos and the nannygais.

Berycids are found in both temperate and tropical waters around the world, between 10 and 1,300 m (33 and 4,265 ft) in depth, though mainly greater than 100 m (330 ft). They are typically red in colour, and measure up to 1 m (3.3 ft) in length. Distinguishing features include spiny scales and large eyes and mouths.

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Distribution

provided by World Register of Marine Species
Distribution: Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific Oceans. A single spine in pelvic fin; soft rays 7-13. No notch in dorsal fin. Dorsal spines 4-7, progressively longer from first to last; soft rays 12-19. Anal fin spines 4; soft rays 12-17 in Centroberyx (=Hoplopteryx) or 25-29 in Beryx. Scales in lateral line 39-51 in Centroberyx or 66-82 in Beryx. Vertebrae 24.
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bibliographic citation
MASDEA (1997).
Contributor
Edward Vanden Berghe [email]