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Alicyclobacillaceae

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The Alicyclobacillaceae are a family of Gram-positive bacteria. All members of this family are aerobic and form endospores.[2]

The family contains four genera: Alicyclobacillus, Effusibacillus, Kyrpidia, and Tumebacillus.[2] When originally created in 2009, Alicyclobacillaceae was a monophyletic family, only including genus Alicyclobacillus. In 2011, the novel genus Kyrpidia was proposed and placed in family Alicyclobacillaceae, and Tumebacillus was placed into the family as well.[3] In 2014, the novel genus Effusibacillus was proposed and added as the fourth member of Alicyclobacillaceae.[2]

Alicyclobacillus is the largest genus in Alicyclobacillaceae, with over 20 validly published species. The species are all acidophilic and have thermally resistant endospores. Many species are common soil organisms. Certain Alicyclobacillus species (especially A. acidoterrestris) have been implicated in spoilage of pasteurized fruit juice.[4]

Effusibacillus contains three species (as of 2019). Members of this genus have been isolated from a lake in Japan, a lake in Antarctica, and from the blood of a woman. E. lacus and E. pohliae are both thermophiles, with optimum growth temperatures above 50 °C, while the optimum growth temperature for E. consociatus is 30 °C.[2][5][6]

Kyrpidia contains two species (as of 2019). Both species of Kyrpidia have been isolated from areas of high volcanic activity in Tuscany, Italy, and the Azores. The optimum temperature for growth for both members of the genus is approximately 55 °C.[7][8]

Tumebacillus contains 8 species. Members of this genus have been isolated from arctic permafrost, soil samples, cassava wastewater, decomposing algal scum, river water, and the gut of a vulture.[9] Tumebacillus was found during surveys of nasal airways of infants, an underground subway in Norway, and a mountain observatory in Austria.[10][11][12]

No member of Alicyclobacillaceae has been found to be infectious. Effusibacillus consociatus was isolated from human blood and Tumebacillus was found during a survey of nasal airways of infants, but in neither instance were the bacteria found to be the cause of infection.[13][14]

References

  1. ^ da Costa, M. S.; Rainey, F. A. (2009). Family II. Alicyclobacillaceae fam. nov. Bergey's Manual of Systematic Bacteriology (2nd ed.). Volume 3. p. 229.CS1 maint: location (link)
  2. ^ a b c d Watanabe, M.; Kojima, H.; Fukui, M. (23 May 2014). "Proposal of Effusibacillus lacus gen. nov., sp. nov., and reclassification of Alicyclobacillus pohliae as Effusibacillus pohliae comb. nov. and Alicyclobacillus consociatus as Effusibacillus consociatus comb. nov". International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology. 64 (Pt 8): 2770–2774. doi:10.1099/ijs.0.055814-0.
  3. ^ Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla; Chertkov, Olga; Copeland, Alex; Del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Daum, Chris; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Chang, Yun-juan; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Jeffries, Cynthia D.; Detter, John C.; Rohde, Manfred; Abt, Birte; Pukall, Rüdiger; Göker, Markus; Bristow, James; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Eisen, Jonathan A. (23 September 2011). "Complete genome sequence of the thermophilic, hydrogen-oxidizing Bacillus tusciae type strain (T2T) and reclassification in the new genus, Kyrpidia gen. nov. as Kyrpidia tusciae comb. nov. and emendation of the family Alicyclobacillaceae da Costa and Rainey, 2010". Standards in Genomic Sciences. 5 (1): 121–134. doi:10.4056/sigs.2144922.
  4. ^ Pornpukdeewattana, Soisuda; Jindaprasert, Aphacha; Massa, Salvatore (7 February 2019). "Alicyclobacillus spoilage and control - a review". Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition. 60 (1): 108–122. doi:10.1080/10408398.2018.1516190.
  5. ^ Imperio, T.; Viti, C.; Marri, L. (1 January 2008). "Alicyclobacillus pohliae sp. nov., a thermophilic, endospore-forming bacterium isolated from geothermal soil of the north-west slope of Mount Melbourne (Antarctica)". International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology. 58 (1): 221–225. doi:10.1099/ijs.0.65092-0.
  6. ^ Glaeser, S. P.; Falsen, E.; Martin, K.; Kampfer, P. (19 April 2013). "Alicyclobacillus consociatus sp. nov., isolated from a human clinical specimen". International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology. 63 (Pt 10): 3623–3627. doi:10.1099/ijs.0.048173-0.
  7. ^ Reiner, Johannes Eberhard; Lapp, Christian Jonas; Bunk, Boyke; Spröer, Cathrin; Overmann, Jörg; Gescher, Johannes (18 January 2018). "Complete Genome Sequence of Kyrpidia sp. Strain EA-1, a Thermophilic Knallgas Bacterium, Isolated from the Azores". Genome Announcements. 6 (3). doi:10.1128/genomeA.01505-17.
  8. ^ Reiner, Johannes Eberhard; Jung, Tobias; Lapp, Christian Jonas; Siedler, Marvin; Bunk, Boyke; Overmann, Jörg; Gescher, Johannes (1 December 2018). "Kyrpidia spormannii sp. nov., a thermophilic, hydrogen-oxidizing, facultative autotroph, isolated from hydrothermal systems at São Miguel Island, and emended description of the genus Kyrpidia". International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology. 68 (12): 3735–3740. doi:10.1099/ijsem.0.003037.
  9. ^ Sung, Hojun; Kim, Hyun Sik; Lee, June-Young; Kang, Woorim; Kim, Pil Soo; Hyun, Dong-Wook; Tak, Euon Jung; Jung, Mi-Ja; Yun, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Min-Soo; Shin, Na-Ri; Whon, Tae Woong; Rho, Jeong Rae; Park, Sun Duk; Shim, Hyung Eun; Bae, Jin-Woo (1 May 2018). "Tumebacillus avium sp. nov., isolated from the gut of a cinereous vulture, Aegypius monachus". International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology. 68 (5): 1659–1664. doi:10.1099/ijsem.0.002725.
  10. ^ Hasegawa, Kohei; Linnemann, Rachel W.; Mansbach, Jonathan M.; Ajami, Nadim J.; Espinola, Janice A.; Petrosino, Joseph F.; Piedra, Pedro A.; Stevenson, Michelle D.; Sullivan, Ashley F.; Thompson, Amy D.; Camargo, Carlos A. (November 2017). "Nasal Airway Microbiota Profile and Severe Bronchiolitis in Infants". The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal. 36 (11): 1044–1051. doi:10.1097/INF.0000000000001500.
  11. ^ Dybwad, Marius; Granum, Per Einar; Bruheim, Per; Blatny, Janet Martha (15 March 2012). "Characterization of Airborne Bacteria at an Underground Subway Station". Applied and Environmental Microbiology. 78 (6): 1917–1929. doi:10.1128/AEM.07212-11.
  12. ^ Els, Nora; Larose, Catherine; Baumann-Stanzer, Kathrin; Tignat-Perrier, Romie; Keuschnig, Christoph; Vogel, Timothy M.; Sattler, Birgit (4 September 2019). "Microbial composition in seasonal time series of free tropospheric air and precipitation reveals community separation". Aerobiologia. 35 (4): 671–701. doi:10.1007/s10453-019-09606-x.
  13. ^ Hasegawa, Kohei; Linnemann, Rachel W.; Mansbach, Jonathan M.; Ajami, Nadim J.; Espinola, Janice A.; Petrosino, Joseph F.; Piedra, Pedro A.; Stevenson, Michelle D.; Sullivan, Ashley F.; Thompson, Amy D.; Camargo, Carlos A. (November 2017). "Nasal Airway Microbiota Profile and Severe Bronchiolitis in Infants". The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal. 36 (11): 1044–1051. doi:10.1097/INF.0000000000001500.
  14. ^ Glaeser, S. P.; Falsen, E.; Martin, K.; Kampfer, P. (19 April 2013). "Alicyclobacillus consociatus sp. nov., isolated from a human clinical specimen". International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology. 63 (Pt 10): 3623–3627. doi:10.1099/ijs.0.048173-0.
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Alicyclobacillaceae: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

The Alicyclobacillaceae are a family of Gram-positive bacteria. All members of this family are aerobic and form endospores.

The family contains four genera: Alicyclobacillus, Effusibacillus, Kyrpidia, and Tumebacillus. When originally created in 2009, Alicyclobacillaceae was a monophyletic family, only including genus Alicyclobacillus. In 2011, the novel genus Kyrpidia was proposed and placed in family Alicyclobacillaceae, and Tumebacillus was placed into the family as well. In 2014, the novel genus Effusibacillus was proposed and added as the fourth member of Alicyclobacillaceae.

Alicyclobacillus is the largest genus in Alicyclobacillaceae, with over 20 validly published species. The species are all acidophilic and have thermally resistant endospores. Many species are common soil organisms. Certain Alicyclobacillus species (especially A. acidoterrestris) have been implicated in spoilage of pasteurized fruit juice.

Effusibacillus contains three species (as of 2019). Members of this genus have been isolated from a lake in Japan, a lake in Antarctica, and from the blood of a woman. E. lacus and E. pohliae are both thermophiles, with optimum growth temperatures above 50 °C, while the optimum growth temperature for E. consociatus is 30 °C.

Kyrpidia contains two species (as of 2019). Both species of Kyrpidia have been isolated from areas of high volcanic activity in Tuscany, Italy, and the Azores. The optimum temperature for growth for both members of the genus is approximately 55 °C.

Tumebacillus contains 8 species. Members of this genus have been isolated from arctic permafrost, soil samples, cassava wastewater, decomposing algal scum, river water, and the gut of a vulture. Tumebacillus was found during surveys of nasal airways of infants, an underground subway in Norway, and a mountain observatory in Austria.

No member of Alicyclobacillaceae has been found to be infectious. Effusibacillus consociatus was isolated from human blood and Tumebacillus was found during a survey of nasal airways of infants, but in neither instance were the bacteria found to be the cause of infection.

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