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Rotoitidae

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The Rotoitidae are a very small family of rare, relictual parasitic wasps in the superfamily Chalcidoidea, known primarily from fossils (14 extinct species in two genera, Baeomorpha and Taimyromorpha).[1] Only two extant species are known, each in its own genus, one from New Zealand and one from Chile, and little is known about their biology. Females of the Chilean species, Chiloe micropteron, have their wings reduced to tiny bristles. Most fossil species are known from the Taimyr amber of Russia and Canadian amber,[2] but one species, Baeomorpha liorum is known from the Burmese amber.[1]

Rotoitids are very close to the base of the chalcidoid family tree, presently considered to be the first "branch" taxon after the Mymaridae.[1]

References

  1. ^ a b c Huber JT, Shih C, Dong R (2019) A new species of Baeomorpha (Hymenoptera, Rotoitidae) from mid-Cretaceous Burmese amber. Journal of Hymenoptera Research 72: 1-10. https://doi.org/10.3897/jhr.72.35502
  2. ^ Gumovsky, Alex; Perkovsky, Evgeny; Rasnitsyn, Alexandr (April 2018). "Laurasian ancestors and "Gondwanan" descendants of Rotoitidae (Hymenoptera: Chalcidoidea): What a review of Late Cretaceous Baeomorpha revealed". Cretaceous Research. 84: 286–322. doi:10.1016/j.cretres.2017.10.027. ISSN 0195-6671.

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Rotoitidae: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

The Rotoitidae are a very small family of rare, relictual parasitic wasps in the superfamily Chalcidoidea, known primarily from fossils (14 extinct species in two genera, Baeomorpha and Taimyromorpha). Only two extant species are known, each in its own genus, one from New Zealand and one from Chile, and little is known about their biology. Females of the Chilean species, Chiloe micropteron, have their wings reduced to tiny bristles. Most fossil species are known from the Taimyr amber of Russia and Canadian amber, but one species, Baeomorpha liorum is known from the Burmese amber.

Rotoitids are very close to the base of the chalcidoid family tree, presently considered to be the first "branch" taxon after the Mymaridae.

license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
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wikipedia EN