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Coenagrionidae
provided by wikipedia EN

The insect family Coenagrionidae is placed in the order Odonata and the suborder Zygoptera.[2] The Zygoptera are the damselflies, which although less known than the dragonflies, are no less common. More than 1,100 species are in this family, making it the largest damselfly family. The family Coenagrionidae has six subfamilies: Agriocnemidinae, Argiinae, Coenagrioninae, Ischnurinae, Leptobasinae, and Pseudagrioninae.

This family is referred to as the narrow-winged damselflies or the pond damselflies.[3] The Coenagrionidae enjoy a worldwide distribution, and are among the most common of damselfly families. This family has the smallest of damselfly species. More than 90 genera of the family Coenagrionidae are currently accepted.[4]

Etymology

The name may be derived from Greek coen meaning shared or common and agrio meaning fields or wild.

Characteristics

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forewing of the variable damselfly (Coenagrion pulchellum)
  • Usually have a black pattern
  • Ground color may be green, blue, yellow, orange, or purple
  • Narrow, stalked, usually colorless and clear wings
  • Two antenodal cross veins
  • Vein M3 arising nearer to nodus than arculus

Adults are seen around various habitats including ponds and wetlands. The females lay their eggs among living or dead submerged vegetation, and in some species, even crawl about underwater depositing their eggs. The nymphs are usually found in debris or among living or dead submerged plant material.[5]

Genera

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Eastern billabong fly (Austroagrion watsoni, female)
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Coromandel marsh dart Ceriagrion coromandelianum
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Azure damselfly, Coenagrion puella
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Blue-tailed damselfly, Ischnura elegans
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Saffron-faced blue dart Pseudagrion rubriceps

The following is a complete list of genera:

See also

 src= Wikimedia Commons has media related to Coenagrionidae.  src= Wikispecies has information related to Coenagrionidae

References

  1. ^ Kirby, W.F. (1890). A Synonymic Catalogue of Neuroptera Odonata, or Dragonflies. With an Appendix of fossil species. London: Gurney & Jackson. pp. 202 [148]. doi:10.5962/bhl.title.5534..mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output q{quotes:"""""'"'"}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-free a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-registration a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}
  2. ^ Dijkstra, K.D.B.; et al. (2013). "The classification and diversity of dragonflies and damselflies (Odonata). In: Zhang, Z.-Q. (Ed.) Animal Biodiversity: An Outline of Higher-level Classification and Survey of Taxonomic Richness (Addenda 2013)". Zootaxa. 3703 (1): 36–45. doi:10.11646/zootaxa.3703.1.9.
  3. ^ Borror, D.J.; White, R.E. (1970). A Field Guide to Insects. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company. ISBN 0-395-91171-0.
  4. ^ Integrated Taxonomic Information System (2007). Coenagrionidae, retrieved November 4, 2007.
  5. ^ John L. Capinera (2008). Encyclopedia of Entomology. Springer Science & Business Media. pp. 1244–1245. ISBN 978-1-4020-6242-1.

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Coenagrionidae: Brief Summary
provided by wikipedia EN

The insect family Coenagrionidae is placed in the order Odonata and the suborder Zygoptera. The Zygoptera are the damselflies, which although less known than the dragonflies, are no less common. More than 1,100 species are in this family, making it the largest damselfly family. The family Coenagrionidae has six subfamilies: Agriocnemidinae, Argiinae, Coenagrioninae, Ischnurinae, Leptobasinae, and Pseudagrioninae.

This family is referred to as the narrow-winged damselflies or the pond damselflies. The Coenagrionidae enjoy a worldwide distribution, and are among the most common of damselfly families. This family has the smallest of damselfly species. More than 90 genera of the family Coenagrionidae are currently accepted.

license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN
ID
248a89b1193f3ab4c2bed372daad141f