Description

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Shrub or under-sized tree with reddish bark, entirely glabrous, leaves vaginate, abruptly acuminate, 1.5-3 mm long, with a broad whitish margin. Plants dioecious. Recemes aestival, simple or loosely compound male racemes, 3-8 cm long, 7-8 mm broad, compact, female raceme as long as the male raceme or somewhat longer, 3-5 mm broad. Flowers purple or purplish pink, subsessile. Bracts semiamplexicaul, triangular, acuminate, 2.5-3 mm long, 1 mm broad. Sepals 5, ovate to broadly ovate or somewhat orbicular, c. 2 mm long, c. 1.5 mm broad, almost entire, obtuse. Petals 5, free, obovate, 2.5 mm long, 1-1.25 mm broad, entire, obtuse. Stamens 5, filaments filiform, 1.75-2 mm long, inserted in between the notches of the disc (mesodiscine disc), notches almost entire to slightly emarginate, anthers obtuse, ± sagittate; stamens abortive in the female flowers. Styles 3 as long as the ovary or slightly shorter, exserted, ovary triquetrous 1-1.5 mm long, abortive or absent in male flowers.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of Pakistan Vol. 0: 29 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of Pakistan @ eFloras.org
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S. I. Ali & M. Qaiser
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eFloras.org
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Distribution

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C. Asia, Afghanistan, Tropical Himalaya, N. India, Burma.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Annotated Checklist of the Flowering Plants of Nepal Vol. 0 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Annotated Checklist of the Flowering Plants of Nepal @ eFloras.org
author
K.K. Shrestha, J.R. Press and D.A. Sutton
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eFloras.org
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Distribution

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Distribution: Pakistan, Iran, Afghanistan, India, Nepal, Bangla Desh and Burma.
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cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of Pakistan Vol. 0: 29 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of Pakistan @ eFloras.org
editor
S. I. Ali & M. Qaiser
project
eFloras.org
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eFloras

Elevation Range

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100-400 m
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Annotated Checklist of the Flowering Plants of Nepal Vol. 0 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Annotated Checklist of the Flowering Plants of Nepal @ eFloras.org
author
K.K. Shrestha, J.R. Press and D.A. Sutton
project
eFloras.org
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eFloras

Flower/Fruit

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Fl. Per.: April-November.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of Pakistan Vol. 0: 29 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of Pakistan @ eFloras.org
editor
S. I. Ali & M. Qaiser
project
eFloras.org
original
visit source
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eFloras

Tamarix dioica

provided by wikipedia EN

Tamarix dioica is a twiggy shrub or small tree that grows in saline habitats in western Asia. Common names include ghaz and khagal in Pakistan,[1] lal jhau, urusia, ban jhau, nona-gach, urichiya in Bangladesh and nona jhau in the Sunderbans.[2]

Description

Tamarix dioica is a shrub or small tree with reddish bark which grows to a maximum height of 6 m (20 ft). The leaves are greyish-green, tiny and scale-like, overlapping each other along the stem. Male and female flowers grow on separate plants. The inflorescences are racemes up to 8 cm (3 in) long with pink or purple flowers[2][3]

Distribution and habitat

Tamarix dioica is native to Iran, Afghanistan, Pakistan, India, Nepal, Bangladesh and Burma.[3] It is one of the dominant plants of dwarf semi-shrub desert vegetation in flood plains and dry riverbeds where it occurs in association with Salvadora persica and Vachellia nilotica subsp. indica.[4]

Uses

Tamarix dioica is used in traditional medicine as a diuretic and a carminative,[1] as an astringent,[2] and for the treatment of inflammation of the liver and spleen. An extract of the leaves has been shown to have antifungal activity. Phytochemical screening reveals the presence of several unusual phytochemicals and further investigation needs to be undertaken to determine whether any of these are a potential source of useful drugs.[1]

References

  1. ^ a b c Samejoa, Muhammad Qasim; Sumbula, Adeela; Shaha, Shahnila; Memona, Sara Bano; Chundrigara, Shahjabeen (2013). "Phytochemical screening of Tamarix dioica Roxb. ex Roch". Journal of Pharmacy Research. 7 (2): 181–183. doi:10.1016/j.jopr.2013.02.017.
  2. ^ a b c "Tamarix dioica". Medicinal plants of Bangladesh. Retrieved 21 February 2016.
  3. ^ a b "Tamarix dioica". Flora of Pakistan. efloras.org. Retrieved 21 February 2016.
  4. ^ Perry, R.A.; Goodall, D.W. (1979). Arid Land Ecosystems: Volume 1: Structure, Functioning and Management. CUP Archive. p. 256. ISBN 978-0-521-21842-9.
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Tamarix dioica: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Tamarix dioica is a twiggy shrub or small tree that grows in saline habitats in western Asia. Common names include ghaz and khagal in Pakistan, lal jhau, urusia, ban jhau, nona-gach, urichiya in Bangladesh and nona jhau in the Sunderbans.

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