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Description

provided by Flora of Zimbabwe
Herbs, sometimes ± woody at the base, or shrubs. Stipules minute or 0. Leaves alternate or opposite, rarely whorled, simple, entire, lobed or pinnatifid. Flowers bisexual or (rarely) unisexual, actinomorphic, 4- or 5-merous (rarely 2-, 3- or 6-merous). A long hypanthium usually present (not in Ludwigia). Petals free, sometimes 0. Stamens usually twice as many as the sepals in 2 whorls. Ovary inferior. Style single, stigma variously shaped. Fruit usually a loculicidally or irregularly dehiscent capsule, 1-many-seeded.
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Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings
bibliographic citation
Hyde, M.A., Wursten, B.T. and Ballings, P. (2002-2014). Onagraceae Flora of Zimbabwe website. Accessed 28 August 2014 at http://www.zimbabweflora.co.zw/speciesdata/family.php?family_id=158
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Mark Hyde
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Bart Wursten
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Petra Ballings
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Flora of Zimbabwe

Onagraceae

provided by wikipedia EN

The Onagraceae are a family of flowering plants known as the willowherb family or evening primrose family. They include about 650 species of herbs, shrubs, and trees[3] in 17 genera.[4] The family is widespread, occurring on every continent from boreal to tropical regions.

The family includes a number of popular garden plants, including evening primroses (Oenothera) and fuchsias (Fuchsia). Some, particularly the willowherbs (Epilobium), are common weeds in gardens and rapidly colonize disturbed habitats in the wild. One such species is fireweed (Chamaenerion angustifolium).

The family is characterised by flowers with usually four sepals and petals; in some genera, such as Fuchsia, the sepals are as brightly coloured as the petals.

The seeds are generally very small. In some genera, such as Epilobium, they have tufts of hairs[5] and are dispersed on the wind. In others, such as Fuchsia, the seeds develop in juicy berries dispersed by animals. The leaves are commonly opposite or whorled, but are spirally arranged in some species; in most, they are simple and lanceolate in shape. The pollen grains in many genera are loosely held together by viscin threads. Most bees cannot collect it, and only bees with specialized morphologies can effectively pollinate the flowers; nearly all bee taxa that visit the flowers are oligoleges specialized on the family Onagraceae.

The family was named after the genus Onagra (now known as Oenothera) in 1836 by John Lindley in the second edition of A Natural System of Botany.

Genera

Subfamily Ludwigioideae

Subfamily Onagroideae

Tribe Circaeeae
Tribe Epilobieae
Tribe Gongylocarpeae
Tribe Hauyeae
Tribe Lopezieae
Tribe Onagreae

Several genera are synonymized in the classification presented above, in particular Calylophus and Gaura, which have both been absorbed into Oenothera but appear often in the literature as belonging to the previous genera.

Gallery

References

  1. ^ Angiosperm Phylogeny Group (2009). "An update of the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group classification for the orders and families of flowering plants: APG III" (PDF). Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society. 161 (2): 105–121. doi:10.1111/j.1095-8339.2009.00996.x. Retrieved 2013-07-06.
  2. ^ "Family: Onagraceae Juss., nom. cons". Germplasm Resources Information Network. United States Department of Agriculture. 2007-04-12. Retrieved 2010-10-29.
  3. ^ Onagraceae. Flora of China.
  4. ^ Ford, V. S.; Gottlieb, L. D. (2007). "Tribal Relationships within Onagraceae Inferred from PgiC Sequences". Systematic Botany. 32 (2): 348–356. doi:10.1600/036364407781179725. JSTOR 25064249.
  5. ^ Epilobium. Flora of China.
  6. ^ "GRIN Genera of Onagraceae subfamily Ludwigioideae". Germplasm Resources Information Network. United States Department of Agriculture. Retrieved 2010-10-29.
  7. ^ "GRIN Genera of Onagraceae tribe Circaeeae". Germplasm Resources Information Network. United States Department of Agriculture. Retrieved 2010-10-29.
  8. ^ "GRIN Genera of Onagraceae tribe Epilobieae". Germplasm Resources Information Network. United States Department of Agriculture. Retrieved 2010-10-29.
  9. ^ "GRIN Genera of Onagraceae tribe Gongylocarpeae". Germplasm Resources Information Network. United States Department of Agriculture. Retrieved 2010-10-29.
  10. ^ "GRIN Genera of Onagraceae tribe Hauyeae". Germplasm Resources Information Network. United States Department of Agriculture. Retrieved 2010-10-29.
  11. ^ "GRIN Genera of Onagraceae tribe Lopezieae". Germplasm Resources Information Network. United States Department of Agriculture. Retrieved 2010-10-29.
  12. ^ a b "Oenothera". Germplasm Resources Information Network. United States Department of Agriculture. Retrieved 2013-01-29.
  13. ^ "GRIN Genera of Onagraceae tribe Onagreae". Germplasm Resources Information Network. United States Department of Agriculture. Retrieved 2010-10-29.

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Onagraceae: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

The Onagraceae are a family of flowering plants known as the willowherb family or evening primrose family. They include about 650 species of herbs, shrubs, and trees in 17 genera. The family is widespread, occurring on every continent from boreal to tropical regions.

The family includes a number of popular garden plants, including evening primroses (Oenothera) and fuchsias (Fuchsia). Some, particularly the willowherbs (Epilobium), are common weeds in gardens and rapidly colonize disturbed habitats in the wild. One such species is fireweed (Chamaenerion angustifolium).

The family is characterised by flowers with usually four sepals and petals; in some genera, such as Fuchsia, the sepals are as brightly coloured as the petals.

The seeds are generally very small. In some genera, such as Epilobium, they have tufts of hairs and are dispersed on the wind. In others, such as Fuchsia, the seeds develop in juicy berries dispersed by animals. The leaves are commonly opposite or whorled, but are spirally arranged in some species; in most, they are simple and lanceolate in shape. The pollen grains in many genera are loosely held together by viscin threads. Most bees cannot collect it, and only bees with specialized morphologies can effectively pollinate the flowers; nearly all bee taxa that visit the flowers are oligoleges specialized on the family Onagraceae.

The family was named after the genus Onagra (now known as Oenothera) in 1836 by John Lindley in the second edition of A Natural System of Botany.

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copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
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visit source
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wikipedia EN