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Description of Chromatiaceae

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The phototrophic purple bacteria and make up the purple (or red) sulfur bacteria with the Ectothiorhodospiraceae. Typically grow under anoxic conditions in the light using sulphides as photosynthetic electron donors, oxidizing the substrate to sulfate. Elemental sulphur may accumulate inside the cells. A number of species also can grow under chemotrophic conditions in the dark, either autotrophically or heterotrophically using oxygen as terminal electron acceptor in respiratory processes. Phototrophic growth, photosynthetic pigment synthesis, and internal membrane formation are ihibited by oxygen.
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Chromatiaceae

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The Chromatiaceae are the main family of purple sulfur bacteria. Many members conduct an anoxygenic photosynthesis. They are distinguished from the Ectothiorhodospiraceae by producing sulfur globules and storing them inside their cells. Most species of the Ectothiorhodospiraceae are also purple sulfur bacteria, but they store the globules outside their cells.[3] The sulfur is an intermediate in the oxidization of sulfide, which is ultimately converted into sulfate, and may serve as a reserve.[3]

Nitrosococcus belongs to the nitrifying bacteria.[3]

Members are found in both anoxygenic parts of fresh and salt water, and are especially common in stagnant pools, marine habitats, sulfur springs, and soda and salt lakes.[3]

Chromatiaceae bacteria have been the cause for some low-oxygen lakes turning "blood red", such as O.C. Fisher Reservoir in San Angelo, Texas, USA.[4]

References

  1. ^ BAVENDAMM (W.): Die Farblosen und Roten Schwefelbakterien des Süss-und Salzwassers, Pflanzenforschung (edited by Kolkwitz), Berlin-Dahlem, 1924, pp. 1-156.
  2. ^ a b c d e f Parker, Charles Thomas; Osier, Nicole Danielle; Garrity, George M (29 April 2009). "Taxonomic Abstract for the families". NamesforLife, LLC. doi:10.1601/tx.2070. Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  3. ^ a b c d George M. Garrity: Bergey's Manual of Systematic Bacteriology. 2. Auflage. Springer, New York, 2005, Volume 2: The Proteobacteria, Part B: The Gammaproteobacteria
  4. ^ "End Times? Texas Lake Turns Blood-Red". 2015-03-25.
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Chromatiaceae: Brief Summary

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The Chromatiaceae are the main family of purple sulfur bacteria. Many members conduct an anoxygenic photosynthesis. They are distinguished from the Ectothiorhodospiraceae by producing sulfur globules and storing them inside their cells. Most species of the Ectothiorhodospiraceae are also purple sulfur bacteria, but they store the globules outside their cells. The sulfur is an intermediate in the oxidization of sulfide, which is ultimately converted into sulfate, and may serve as a reserve.

Nitrosococcus belongs to the nitrifying bacteria.

Members are found in both anoxygenic parts of fresh and salt water, and are especially common in stagnant pools, marine habitats, sulfur springs, and soda and salt lakes.

Chromatiaceae bacteria have been the cause for some low-oxygen lakes turning "blood red", such as O.C. Fisher Reservoir in San Angelo, Texas, USA.

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