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Loliginidae

provided by wikipedia EN

Loliginidae, commonly known as pencil squids, is an aquatic family of squid classified in the order Myopsida.

Taxonomy

The family Loliginidae was formerly classified in the order Teuthida.

Taxonomic list

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Caribbean reef squid
(Sepioteuthis sepioidea)
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Bigfin reef squid
(Sepioteuthis lessoniana)

The classification below follows Vecchione et al. (2005)[2] and the Tree of Life Web Project (2010).[3]

Several doubtfully distinct species have also been described; see the genus articles for these.

References

  1. ^ Brakoniecki, T.F. (1996). A revision of the genus Pickfordiateuthis Voss, 1953 (Cephalopoda; Myopsida). Bulletin of Marine Science 58(1): 9–28.
  2. ^ Vecchione, M., E. Shea, S. Bussarawit, F. Anderson, D. Alexeyev, C.-C. Lu, T. Okutani, M. Roeleveld, C. Chotiyaputta, C. Roper, E. Jorgensen & N. Sukramongkol. (2005). "Systematics of Indo-West Pacific loliginids" (PDF). Phuket Marine Biological Center Research Bulletin 66: 23–26.
  3. ^ Vecchione, M. & R.E. Young. (2010). Loliginidae Lesueur, 1821. The Tree of Life Web Project.

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Loliginidae: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Loliginidae, commonly known as pencil squids, is an aquatic family of squid classified in the order Myopsida.

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Description

provided by World Register of Marine Species
Shape variable from short and stout to long and slender. Fins terminal or marginal, but always united posteriorly; funnel-locking apparatus a simple, straight groove. Eyes covered with transparent skin (corneal membrane); buccal connectives attached to ventral borders of fourth arms; 7 buccal lappets supplied with small suckers (except in Lolliguncula and Alloteuthis); 8 arms and 2 tentacles around mouth; 2 rows of suckers on arms and 4 rows on tentacular clubs, hooks never present. Usually the left arm of the IV (ventral) pair is hectocotylized in males (used to transfer sperm packets from the male to the female); the structure of the modified portion (hectocotylus) of the arm is useful in most species as a diagnostic character (often, the suckers on the hectocotylus are reduced in size or number, or modified into fleshy papillae or flaps (lamellae), or they disappear altogether. Colour: usually reddish-brown, darker dorsally, but quite variable depending on the behavioural situation.
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bibliographic citation
MASDEA (1997).
Contributor
Edward Vanden Berghe [email]