dcsimg

Smooth skate

provided by wikipedia EN

The Anacanthobatidae, the smooth skates or leg skates, are a family of skates found at depths below 200 m (660 ft) in the Indian, Pacific and Atlantic Oceans.[1][3]

They lack the dorsal denticles (sharp, tooth-like scales) of other rays, hence their name, from Greek an- meaning "without", acantha meaning "thorn", and bathys meaning "deep".

They are bottom-dwelling fishes found on the continental slopes of tropical and subtropical waters.

References

  1. ^ a b Froese, Rainer, and Daniel Pauly, eds. (2014). "Anacanthobatidae" in FishBase. February 2014 version.
  2. ^ Weigmann, S., Stehmann, M.F.W. & Thiel, R. (2014): Complementary redescription of Anacanthobatis ori (Wallace, 1967) and its assignment to Indobatis n. g. (Elasmobranchii, Anacanthobatidae), with comments on other legskates. Zootaxa, 3779 (2): 101–132.
  3. ^ https://www.researchgate.net/publication/311043869_Changes_to_the_nomenclature_of_the_skates_Chondrichthyes_Rajiformes
 title=
license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN

Smooth skate: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

The Anacanthobatidae, the smooth skates or leg skates, are a family of skates found at depths below 200 m (660 ft) in the Indian, Pacific and Atlantic Oceans.

They lack the dorsal denticles (sharp, tooth-like scales) of other rays, hence their name, from Greek an- meaning "without", acantha meaning "thorn", and bathys meaning "deep".

They are bottom-dwelling fishes found on the continental slopes of tropical and subtropical waters.

license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN

Description

provided by World Register of Marine Species
A terminal filament of varying length arising from a small, bluntly rounded protuberance at the tip of the snout. Dorsal fins absent, but membranous caudal fin present. Five pairs of small, ventral gill slits. Dorsal and ventral surfaces of disc smooth, without dermal denticles. Tail slender, a bit shorter than disc. Small skates of slope regions in tropical/subtropical waters. Known from South Africa, Natal, and the tropical western Atlantic; also from Taiwan.
license
cc-by-4.0
copyright
WoRMS Editorial Board
bibliographic citation
MASDEA (1997).
Contributor
Edward Vanden Berghe [email]