dcsimg

Brief Summary

    North American Ecology (US and Canada)
    provided by North American Butterfly Knowledge Network
    Speyeria hydaspe is resident to the northwestern United States (Scott 1986). Habitats are moist dense woodland. Host plants are herbaceous, restricted to several species in genus Viola. Eggs are laid haphazardly, near the host plant, singly. Individuals overwinter as unfed, first instar larvae. There one flight each year with the approximate flight time June 1-Sept. 30 (Scott 1986).
    Speyeria hydaspe: Brief Summary
    provided by wikipedia

    Speyeria hydaspe, the Hydaspe fritillary, is a species of orange-brown butterfly found in the western portions of the United States and Canada. A small fritillary, it usually has cream-colored underwing spots, but the Vancouver Island subspecies has silver spots. It is similar to S. zerene and S. atlantis, but may be distinguished by the smooth and even appearance of its postmedian spotband. The caterpillars feed on violets including Viola glabella. A single brood flies from July through September and feeds on flower nectar. They may be found in moist forests, in clearings and subalpine meadows.

Comprehensive Description

    General Description
    provided by University of Alberta Museums
    The hindwing underside is diagnostic; no other Speyeria has a maroon-brown underside with creamy-white in place of the usual silvery-white discs. Subspecies rhodope occurs in Alberta (Kondla 2001).
    Habitat
    provided by University of Alberta Museums
    Most often found near moist subalpine coniferous forests in Alberta.
    Speyeria hydaspe
    provided by wikipedia

    Speyeria hydaspe, the Hydaspe fritillary, is a species of orange-brown butterfly found in the western portions of the United States and Canada. A small fritillary, it usually has cream-colored underwing spots, but the Vancouver Island subspecies has silver spots. It is similar to S. zerene and S. atlantis, but may be distinguished by the smooth and even appearance of its postmedian spotband.[2] The caterpillars feed on violets including Viola glabella. A single brood flies from July through September and feeds on flower nectar. They may be found in moist forests, in clearings and subalpine meadows. [3]

    References

    1. ^ Hydaspe Fritillary, Butterflies of Canada
    2. ^ Glassberg, Jeffrey (July 26, 2001). Butterflies through Binoculars: The West A Field Guide to the Butterflies of Western North America. USA: Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-510669-5..mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output q{quotes:"""""'"'"}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-free a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-registration a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}
    3. ^ Opler, Paul A.; Harry Pavulaan; Ray E. Stanford; Michael Pogue (2006). "Hydaspe Fritillary (Speyeria hydaspe)". Butterflies and Moths of North America. Bozeman, MT: Mountain Prairie Information Node. Retrieved 2006-08-26.
     src= Wikimedia Commons has media related to Speyeria hydaspe.


    Stub iconThis Heliconiinae article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.
     title=

Distribution

    Distribution
    provided by University of Alberta Museums
    The core of Hydaspe's distribution is the Pacific Northwest, ranging north to central BC and the mountains of southern Alberta, and south to Colorado and California (Scott 1986). There is an isolated population in the Cypress Hills of Saskatchewan (Layberry et al. 1998), so it should be watched for on the Alberta side of the Hills.

Trophic Strategy

    Trophic Strategy
    provided by University of Alberta Museums
    The larvae feed on violets (Viola sp.) (Guppy & Shepard 2001), and adults are attracted to yellow composite flowers (Bird et al. 1995).

Cyclicity

    Cyclicity
    provided by University of Alberta Museums
    One yearly flight peaking in mid July to mid August, depending on altitude and snowpack.

Life Cycle

    Life Cycle
    provided by University of Alberta Museums
    The mature larvae are black and spiny, and lack pale markings (Guppy and Shepard 2001). In the US, first-instar larvae hibernate without feeding (Scott 1986). This species prefers cool/moist coniferous forests of the mountains to the dry grasslands inhabited by most other Speyeria.

Conservation Status

    Conservation Status
    provided by University of Alberta Museums
    Not of concern.