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Brief Summary

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The spider family Corinnidae (antmimic spiders) includes around 1083 species (Platnick 2013). In North America north of Mexico there are around 127 species, including several introduced species, with most of the diversity found in the southern portion of this region (Ubick and Richman 2005; Bradley 2013). Corinnids are generally ground dwellers and are commonly found beneath rocks and in leaf litter. Members of the genus Trachelas also occur on foliage and some species frequently enter houses, where they may be of minor medical concern (Platnick and Shadab 1974). The convergent cone-shaped spinnerets of corinnids distinguish them from ground spiders of the family Gnaphosidae, which have conspicuous cylindrical spinnerets that are often visible from above. Like most spiders, corinnids have eight eyes.

Although often brown, some corinnids are colorful. Ant mimicry is common in this family (and at least some species seem to be closely associated with ants) and some species are believed to be mimics of mutillid wasps. Although most corinnids are nocturnal, the ant mimics (as would be expected) tend to be diurnal. As is common for the families of two-clawed hunting spiders (dionychans), corinnids build sac-like retreats, often under rocks or other debris on the ground. The egg sacs, which are typically flat discs, may be deposited in the retreats or attached to the substrate (Comstock [1940] includes a photograph of egg cases of Castianeira descripta on the underside of a stone). Historically, corinnids were included in a family Clubionidae that was defined far more broadly than it is today.

(Ubick and Richman 2005; Bradley 2013)

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Corinnidae

provided by wikipedia EN

Corinnidae is a family of araneomorph spiders, sometimes called corinnid sac spiders. The family, like other "clubionoid" families, has a confusing taxonomic history. Once it was a part of the large catch-all taxon Clubionidae, now very much smaller. The original members of the family are apparently similar only in that they have eight eyes arranged in two rows, conical anterior spinnerets that touch and are generally wandering predators that build silken retreats, or sacs, usually on plant terminals, between leaves, under bark or under rocks.

Two former subfamilies of the Corinnidae are now treated as separate families, Phrurolithidae and Trachelidae. As now recognized, Corinnidae contains 67 genera and over 720 species worldwide.[1] Among the common genera are Castianeira (nearly world wide) and Corinna (widespread).

Members of the genus Castianeira appear to be mimics of ants and velvet ants. Other corinnid ant-like genera include Mazax, Myrmecium and Myrmecotypus. Corinna is the type genus for the family and consists of small running spiders.

Genera

As of April 2019, the World Spider Catalog accepts the following genera:[1]

  • Abapeba Bonaldo, 2000 — South America, Panama, Caribbean, Mexico
  • Aetius O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1897 — Asia, C�te d'Ivoire
  • Allomedmassa Dankittipakul & Singtripop, 2014 — Malaysia, Thailand, China
  • Apochinomma Pavesi, 1881 — South America, Africa, Asia
  • Arushina Caporiacco, 1947 — Tanzania
  • Attacobius Mello-Leitão, 1925 — Brazil, Argentina
  • Austrophaea Lawrence, 1952 — South Africa
  • Battalus Karsch, 1878 — Australia
  • Brachyphaea Simon, 1895 — Tanzania, Kenya, Mozambique
  • Cambalida Simon, 1910 — Africa, India
  • Castianeira Keyserling, 1879 — Central America, Asia, North America, South America, Africa, Europe, Cuba
  • Castoponera Deeleman-Reinhold, 2001 — Indonesia, Malaysia
  • Coenoptychus Simon, 1885 — Africa, Asia
  • Copa Simon, 1886 — Sri Lanka, Africa, Australia
  • Copuetta Haddad, 2013 — Africa
  • Corinna C. L. Koch, 1841 — Caribbean, South America, Africa, Papua New Guinea, Mexico, Central America, Pakistan
  • Corinnomma Karsch, 1880 — Asia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Africa
  • Creugas Thorell, 1878 — Mexico, South America, Myanmar, Australia, Central America
  • Crinopseudoa Jocqué & Bosselaers, 2011 — Guinea, Liberia
  • Cycais Thorell, 1877 — Indonesia, Japan
  • Disnyssus Raven, 2015 — Australia
  • Echinax Deeleman-Reinhold, 2001 — Asia, Africa
  • Ecitocobius Bonaldo & Brescovit, 1998 — Brazil
  • Erendira Bonaldo, 2000 — Venezuela, Panama, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines
  • Falconina Brignoli, 1985 — South America, Panama, Cuba, United States
  • Graptartia Simon, 1896 — Morocco, Algeria
  • Hortipes Bosselaers & Ledoux, 1998 — Africa
  • Humua Ono, 1987 — Japan
  • Ianduba Bonaldo, 1997 — Brazil, Argentina
  • Iridonyssus Raven, 2015 — Australia
  • Kolora Raven, 2015 — Australia
  • Leichhardteus Raven & Baehr, 2013 — Australia
  • Leptopicia Raven, 2015 — Australia
  • Mandaneta Strand, 1932 — Ghana, Congo
  • Mazax O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1898 — North America, Jamaica, Central America, Argentina
  • Medmassa Simon, 1887 — Asia, Oceania
  • Megalostrata Karsch, 1880 — Cuba, Mexico, Panama
  • Melanesotypus Raven, 2015 — Solomon Is.
  • Merenius Simon, 1910 — Africa, Yemen
  • Messapus Simon, 1898 — Africa
  • Methesis Simon, 1896 — South America
  • Myrmecium Latreille, 1824 — South America, Trinidad
  • Myrmecotypus O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1894 — North America, Argentina, Central America
  • Nucastia Raven, 2015 — Australia
  • Nyssus Walckenaer, 1805 — Australia, New Zealand, Fiji
  • Olbus Simon, 1880 — Chile
  • Ozcopa Raven, 2015 — Australia
  • Parachemmis Chickering, 1937 — Panama, South America
  • Paradiestus Mello-Leitão, 1915 — Brazil
  • Paramedmassa Jin, H. Zhang & F. Zhang, 2019 — Thailand, Laos, China
  • Poecilipta Simon, 1897 — Australia
  • Pranburia Deeleman-Reinhold, 1993 — Asia
  • Procopius Thorell, 1899 — Africa
  • Pronophaea Simon, 1897 — South Africa
  • Psellocoptus Simon, 1896 — Venezuela
  • Pseudocorinna Simon, 1910 — Africa
  • Scorteccia Caporiacco, 1936 — Libya
  • Septentrinna Bonaldo, 2000 — United States, Mexico, Guatemala
  • Serendib Deeleman-Reinhold, 2001 — Thailand, Indonesia
  • Simonestus Bonaldo, 2000 — South America, Central America, Mexico
  • Sphecotypus O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1895 — Asia, Nicaragua, Brazil
  • Stethorrhagus Simon, 1896 — South America
  • Tapixaua Bonaldo, 2000 — Brazil, Peru
  • Ticopa Raven, 2015 — Australia
  • Tupirinna Bonaldo, 2000 — Brazil, Venezuela, Panama
  • Vendaphaea Haddad, 2009 — South Africa
  • Wasaka Haddad, 2013 — Africa
  • Xeropigo O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1882 — South America, Trinidad, United States

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "Family: Corinnidae Karsch, 1880". World Spider Catalog. Natural History Museum Bern. Retrieved 2019-04-22.

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Corinnidae: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Corinnidae is a family of araneomorph spiders, sometimes called corinnid sac spiders. The family, like other "clubionoid" families, has a confusing taxonomic history. Once it was a part of the large catch-all taxon Clubionidae, now very much smaller. The original members of the family are apparently similar only in that they have eight eyes arranged in two rows, conical anterior spinnerets that touch and are generally wandering predators that build silken retreats, or sacs, usually on plant terminals, between leaves, under bark or under rocks.

Two former subfamilies of the Corinnidae are now treated as separate families, Phrurolithidae and Trachelidae. As now recognized, Corinnidae contains 67 genera and over 720 species worldwide. Among the common genera are Castianeira (nearly world wide) and Corinna (widespread).

Members of the genus Castianeira appear to be mimics of ants and velvet ants. Other corinnid ant-like genera include Mazax, Myrmecium and Myrmecotypus. Corinna is the type genus for the family and consists of small running spiders.

license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
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wikipedia EN