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Brief Summary

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The 15 described species in the spider family Diguetidae are known only from the New World (Platnick 2013). Diguetids have six eyes arranged in three pairs (the missing eyes are apparently the anterior median eyes). One of the two recognized genera, Diguetia, includes a single species known from Argentina along with another 10 species known from Mexico and the southwestern United States (according to Bradley [2013], seven of these 10 species are known from the United States). The other genus, Segestrioides, includes four South American species. (Ubick 2005; Platnick 2013)

Like most haplogynes, diguetids have six eyes, but unlike most haplogynes (with the exception of the Pholcidae), Diguetia build extensive snare webs on shrubs or cacti (Ubick 2005). The web is a sheet with surrounding tangle and a vertical tubular retreat, in which females deposit their egg sacs (Boulton and Polis 1999). According to Eberhard (1967), the spiders move along the underside of the sheet and capture prey intercepted by the surrounding tangle web.

Boulton and Polis (1999) undertook a three-year study in the Coachella Valley, California, of reproduction, life history, phenology, microhabitat, prey, and dispersion of Diguetia mojavea, a species that is often abundant in California deserts.

Starrett and Waters (2007) detected evidence of past positive natural selection on HSP70 proteins, a group of highly conserved proteins with important roles in thermotolerance, in the desert-dwelling and heat-tolerant diguetids.

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Coneweb spider

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The coneweb spiders of the family Diguetidae are six-eyed haplogyne (lacking hardened female genitalia, or epigyne) spiders that live in tangled space webs. They fashion a cone-like central retreat in which they hide and lay eggs. The family is small (two genera and only 15 species) and is confined to the New World, where it is usually found in deserts. Members of the genus Diguetia usually build their webs in shrubs or between cactus pads. Although they have the same eye arrangement as the venomous recluse spiders (family Sicariidae), none of these genera are known to be harmful to humans.[citation needed]

The Diguetidae are sometimes considered a subfamily of the Plectreuridae.[1]

Taxonomy

The group was first created by F. O. Pickard-Cambridge in 1899 as the subfamily Diguetiinae of the family Scytodidae.[1][2] It was raised to the rank of family by Willis J. Gertsch using the spelling "Diguetidae".[3] Pickard-Cambridge's use of double "i" is correct according to Article 29.3 of the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature,[4] since the name is based on the genus Diguetia. In 2004, Jörg Wonderlich suggested reducing it again to a subfamily, but now of the family Plectreuridae.[5]

Genera and species

As of May 2016[update], the World Spider Catalog accepted the following genera and species:[1]

Diguetia

Diguetia Simon, 1895

Segestrioides

Segestrioides Keyserling, 1883

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d e "Family Diguetidae F. O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1899", World Spider Catalog, Natural History Museum Bern, retrieved 2016-05-13.mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output q{quotes:"""""'"'"}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-free a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-registration a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}
  2. ^ Pickard-Cambridge, F.O. (1899), "Subfam. Diguetiinae", in Godman, Frederick Ducane & Salvin, Osbert, Biologia Centrali-Americana: Arachnida - Araneida and Opiliones II, p. 53, retrieved 2016-05-13
  3. ^ Platnick, N.I. (1989), "A revision of the spider genus Segestrioides (Araneae, Diguetidae)", American Museum Novitates, 2940: 1–9
  4. ^ ICZN (1999), "Art. 29.3", International Code of Zoological Nomenclature (4th ed.), London, UK: The International Trust for Zoological Nomenclature, retrieved 2016-05-13
  5. ^ Wunderlich, J. (2004), "Fossil spiders (Araneae) of the superfamily Dysderoidea in Baltic and Dominican amber, with revised family diagnoses", Beiträge zur Araneologie, 3: 633–746

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Coneweb spider: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

The coneweb spiders of the family Diguetidae are six-eyed haplogyne (lacking hardened female genitalia, or epigyne) spiders that live in tangled space webs. They fashion a cone-like central retreat in which they hide and lay eggs. The family is small (two genera and only 15 species) and is confined to the New World, where it is usually found in deserts. Members of the genus Diguetia usually build their webs in shrubs or between cactus pads. Although they have the same eye arrangement as the venomous recluse spiders (family Sicariidae), none of these genera are known to be harmful to humans.[citation needed]

The Diguetidae are sometimes considered a subfamily of the Plectreuridae.

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