dcsimg

Brief Summary

provided by EOL authors

The essentially tropical and subtropical spider family Hersiliidae (two-tailed or longspinneret spiders) includes 176 described species (Platnick 2013), just two of which occur in North America north of Mexico, both of them poorly known: Neotama mexicana in extreme southern Texas and Yabisi habanensis in extreme southern Florida (Cutler 2005; Bradley 2013).

Hersiliids share a distinctive morphology. The body is dorsoventrally (i.e., top to bottom)flattened with the ocular area raised; the posterior lateral (side) spinnerets are extremely long, as long or longer than the abdomen; there are a series of seta-like spigots along the medial (inner) side of the spinnerets; and the legs are very long and slender.

Hersiliids capture prey by holding their spinnerets over the prey and rapidly circling and swathing them with silk. Some hersiliids are known to live on tree trunks where they rest on silken mats, frequently camouflaged by mosses and lichens. Other species are known from stone fields, where they build irregular webs under rocks. Camouflaged egg sacs are attached to tree limbs or under rocks.

(Rheims and Brescovit 2004; Cutler 2005)

license
cc-by-3.0
copyright
Leo Shapiro
original
visit source
partner site
EOL authors

Tree trunk spider

provided by wikipedia EN

Tree trunk spiders (Hersiliidae) is a tropical and semi-tropical family first described by Tamerlan Thorell in 1870.[1] They have two prominent spinnerets that are almost as long as their abdomen, earning them the nickname "two-tailed spiders". They range in size from 10 to 18 millimetres (0.39 to 0.71 in) long. Rather than using a web that captures prey directly, they lay a light coating of threads over an area of tree bark and wait for an insect to stray onto the patch. When this happens, they encircle their spinnerets around their prey while casting silk on it. When the insect is immobilized, they can bite it through the shroud.

Genera

As of April 2019, the World Spider Catalog accepts the following genera:[2]

  • Bastanius Mirshamsi, Zamani & Marusik, 2016 — Iran
  • Deltshevia Marusik & Fet, 2009 — Turkmenistan, Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan
  • Duninia Marusik & Fet, 2009 — Turkmenistan, Iran
  • Hersilia Audouin, 1826 — Africa, Asia, Oceania
  • Hersiliola Thorell, 1870 — Asia, Africa, Spain
  • Iviraiva Rheims & Brescovit, 2004 — South America
  • Murricia Simon, 1882 — Asia, Africa
  • Neotama Baehr & Baehr, 1993 — South Africa, South America, North America, El Salvador, Asia
  • Ovtsharenkoia Marusik & Fet, 2009 — Central Asia
  • Prima Foord, 2008 — Madagascar
  • Promurricia Baehr & Baehr, 1993 — Sri Lanka
  • Tama Simon, 1882 — Spain, Portugal, Algeria
  • Tamopsis Baehr & Baehr, 1987 — Australia, Indonesia, Papua New Guinea
  • Tyrotama Foord & Dippenaar-Schoeman, 2005 — Africa
  • Yabisi Rheims & Brescovit, 2004 — Dominican Republic, United States, Cuba
  • Ypypuera Rheims & Brescovit, 2004 — South America

Gallery

  • "

    A Hersilia species immobilizing a cicada

  • "

    Injecting venom through the shroud

  • "

    Fully immobilized the cicada

References

  1. ^ Thorell, T. (1870). "On European spiders". Nova Acta Regiae Societatis Scientiarum Upsaliensis. 3 (7): 109–242.
  2. ^ "Family: Hersiliidae Thorell, 1870". World Spider Catalog. Natural History Museum Bern. Retrieved 2019-04-22.
license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN

Tree trunk spider: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Tree trunk spiders (Hersiliidae) is a tropical and semi-tropical family first described by Tamerlan Thorell in 1870. They have two prominent spinnerets that are almost as long as their abdomen, earning them the nickname "two-tailed spiders". They range in size from 10 to 18 millimetres (0.39 to 0.71 in) long. Rather than using a web that captures prey directly, they lay a light coating of threads over an area of tree bark and wait for an insect to stray onto the patch. When this happens, they encircle their spinnerets around their prey while casting silk on it. When the insect is immobilized, they can bite it through the shroud.

license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN