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Brief Summary

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The spider family Titanoecidae has a globally broad distribution and includes 53 described species, four of which occur in North America north of Mexico (Platnick 2014). All four of these North American representatives are in the genus Titanoeca, which is common and distributed across the contiguous United States (excluding peninsular Florida) north to Alaska and southeastern Canada. In the field, titanoecids resemble small to medium-sized amaurobiids, but Cutler (2005) notes that in North America a spider seen in a relatively xeric (arid) habitat near the ground is more likely to be a titanoecid than an amaurobiid.

Like most spiders, titanoecids have eight eyes. The thin cribellate sheet webs are usually built under rocks and often look faintly bluish (Bradley 2013). The egg sacs are globular and suspended in the web (Cutler 2005).

A key to the North American titanoecids was provided by Leech (1972), who treated titanoecids as comprising a subfamily (Titanoecinae) within the family Amaurobiidae.(Cutler 2005; Platnick 2014).

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Titanoecidae

provided by wikipedia EN

Titanoecidae is a spider family with five genera and more than 50 species worldwide. The family is fairly widespread in the New World and Eurasia. Once part of the family Amaurobiidae, these are mostly dark-colored builders of "woolly" (cribellate) silk webs. The main genus is Titanoeca. Several species are found at relatively high altitudes in mountain ranges and may be very common in such habitats.

Genera

As of January 2016[update], the World Spider Catalog accepted the following genera:[1]

  • Anuvinda Lehtinen, 1967 – India, Nepal, China, Thailand, Laos
  • Goeldia Keyserling, 1891 – Mexico, Colombia, Venezuela to Argentina, including Peru and Brazil
  • Nurscia Simon, 1874 – Europe, Egypt, Central Asia, Russia, China, Korea, Taiwan, Japan
  • Pandava Lehtinen, 1967 – widespread from East Africa through South Asia to the Marquesas Islands; introduced into Europe
  • Titanoeca Thorell, 1870 – widespread in the Holarctic south to India

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "Family Family: Titanoecidae Lehtinen,1967", World Spider Catalog, Natural History Museum Bern, retrieved 2016-01-13.mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output q{quotes:"""""'"'"}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-free a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-registration a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}
  2. ^ "Currently valid spider genera and species", World Spider Catalog, Natural History Museum Bern, retrieved 2016-01-13

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Titanoecidae: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Titanoecidae is a spider family with five genera and more than 50 species worldwide. The family is fairly widespread in the New World and Eurasia. Once part of the family Amaurobiidae, these are mostly dark-colored builders of "woolly" (cribellate) silk webs. The main genus is Titanoeca. Several species are found at relatively high altitudes in mountain ranges and may be very common in such habitats.

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wikipedia EN