dcsimg

Reproduction

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Key Reproductive Features: gonochoric/gonochoristic/dioecious (sexes separate); sexual

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2001. "Pedetidae" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Pedetidae.html
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Behavior

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Perception Channels: tactile ; chemical

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2001. "Pedetidae" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Pedetidae.html
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Morphology

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Other Physical Features: endothermic ; bilateral symmetry

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bibliographic citation
2001. "Pedetidae" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Pedetidae.html
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Pedetidae

provided by wikipedia EN

The Pedetidae are a family of mammals from the rodent order.[3][4][5][6][7][8] The two living species, the springhares, are distributed throughout much of southern Africa and also around Kenya, Tanzania, and Uganda.[9] Fossils have been found as far north as Turkey.[10] Together with the anomalures, Pedetidae forms the suborder Anomaluromorpha. The fossil genus Parapedetes is also related.[10]

Taxonomy

The family includes one living genus and three extinct genera. The Asian fossil Diatomys was previously included,[10] but is now classified in the family Diatomyidae with the Laotian rock rat.

References

  1. ^ http://www.ubio.org/browser/details.php?namebankID=104243
  2. ^ https://www.itis.gov/servlet/SingleRpt/SingleRpt?search_topic=TSN&search_value=573169Z
  3. ^ http://www.ubio.org/browser/details.php?namebankID=2476920
  4. ^ http://www.catalogueoflife.org/annual-checklist/2010/browse/tree/id/2243150
  5. ^ http://starcentral.mbl.edu/microscope/portal.php?pagetitle=classification&BLCHID=69-1873
  6. ^ http://www.organismnames.com/details.htm?lsid=648072
  7. ^ http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Pedetidae.html
  8. ^ http://www.eol.org/pages/8701
  9. ^ http://data.gbif.org/species/13149100
  10. ^ a b c McKenna, M.C. and Bell, S.K. 1997. Classification of Mammals: Above the species level. New York: Columbia University Press, 631 pp. ISBN 978-0-231-11013-6 (p. 185)
  11. ^ a b c d M. Pickford and P. Mein (2011). "New Pedetidae (Rodentia: Mammalia) from the Mio-Pliocene of Africa". Estudios Geológicos. 67 (2): 455–469. doi:10.3989/egeol.40714.202.
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Pedetidae: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

The Pedetidae are a family of mammals from the rodent order. The two living species, the springhares, are distributed throughout much of southern Africa and also around Kenya, Tanzania, and Uganda. Fossils have been found as far north as Turkey. Together with the anomalures, Pedetidae forms the suborder Anomaluromorpha. The fossil genus Parapedetes is also related.

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