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Brief Summary

    Halacaridae: Brief Summary
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    Halacaridae is a family of prostigs in the order Trombidiformes. There are at least 30 genera and 230 described species in Halacaridae.

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Comprehensive Description

    Halacaridae
    provided by wikipedia

    Halacaridae is a family of prostigs in the order Trombidiformes. There are at least 30 genera and 230 described species in Halacaridae.[1][2][3][4]

    Genera

    References

    1. ^ "Halacaridae Family Information". BugGuide.net. Retrieved 2018-02-21..mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output q{quotes:"""""'"'"}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-free a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-registration a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}
    2. ^ "Halacaridae Report". Integrated Taxonomic Information System. Retrieved 2018-02-21.
    3. ^ "Halacaridae Overview". Encyclopedia of Life. Retrieved 2018-02-21.
    4. ^ "Browse Halacaridae". Catalogue of Life. Retrieved 2018-02-21.

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    Comprehensive Description
    provided by Invertebrates of the Salish Sea
    Marine mites are chelicerates related to spiders. They are in the same Order as ticks and chiggers. Their body is divided into sections, an anterior prosoma and a posterior opisthosoma. These two sections are often fused together in mites. Mites are usually small, and are very diverse. Size of individuals in this family ranges from 0.18 to 2 mm long.
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    Comprehensive Description
    provided by Invertebrates of the Salish Sea
    Biology/Natural History: Some marine mites are phytophagous, some are predators, and some are parasites. The shape and habits of this individual suggest that it is a predator. Halacaridae use spermatophores during reproduction. One of their larval stages has only 6 legs instead of 8. The larval stages are followed by one to several nymphal instars before they become adults. At least 14 genera of Halacaridae are found in the Pacific Northwest. Unlike the few insects and spiders which may be found in marine habitats but must breathe air, mites are able to absorb oxygen from the water so they can live at great depths.
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Look Alikes

    Look Alikes
    provided by Invertebrates of the Salish Sea
    How to Distinguish from Similar Species: The "velvet mite" Neomulgus littoralis is a commonly encountered species found in the high intertidal and supralittoral. It is bright red and may reach 3-4 mm long. Thinoseius orchestoidae is a member of Suborder Mesostigmata. It attaches to the undersides of the beachhoppers Traskorchestia and Megalorchestia and preys upon nematodes that also live on the amphipods. Members of Suborder Astigmata are mostly small, weakly sclerotized forms that are often found around green algae in tide pools. Suborder Orbatida are dark, heavily sclerotized mites that are often herbivorous and found in the upper intertidal.
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Habitat