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Trombidiformes

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The Trombidiformes are a large, diverse order of mites.

Taxonomy

In 1998, Trombidiformes was divided into the Sphaerolichida and the Prostigmata.[1] The group has few synapomorphies by which it can be defined, unlike the other major group of acariform mites, Sarcoptiformes.[1] Its members include medically important mites (such as Demodex, the chiggers, and scrub-itch mites) and many agriculturally important species, including the spider mites (Tetranychidae) and gall mites (Eriophyidae).[1]

The 2004 classification retained the two suborders, comprising around 125 families and more than 22,000 described species.[2]

In the 2011 revised classification, the order now contains 151 families, 2235 genera and 25,821 species, and there were another 10 species with 24 species that present only as fossils.[3] These 151 families were classified into the same two major suborders[3]

  • Sphaerolichida OConnor, 1984: Now contains only two superfamilies;
  • Prostigmata Kramer, 1877: Still the biggest branch in this taxon, with four infraorders and 40 superfamilies.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c Heather Proctor (August 9, 1998). "Trombidiformes. Trombidiform mites". Tree of Life Web Project. Retrieved June 9, 2010..mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output q{quotes:"""""'"'"}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-free a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-registration a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}
  2. ^ David Evans Walker (2004). "Hidden in Plain Sight: Mites in the Canopy". In Margaret Lowman, H. Bruce Rinker. Forest Canopies. Physiological Ecology Series (2nd ed.). Academic Press. pp. 224–241. ISBN 978-0-12-457553-0.
  3. ^ a b Zhang, Zhi-Qiang; Fan, Qing-Hai; Pesic, Vladimir; Smit, Harry; Bochkov, Andre V.; Khaustov, A. A.; Baker, Anne; Wohltmann, Andreas; Wen, Tinghuan; Amrine, James W.; Beron, P.; Lin, Jianzhen; Gabrys, Grzegorz; Husband, Robert (2011). "Order Trombidiformes Reuter, 1909" (PDF). In Zhang, Z.-Q. Animal biodiversity: An outline of higher-level classification and survey of taxonomic richness. Zootaxa. Magnolia Press. pp. 129–147. ISBN 978-1-86977-850-7. ISSN 1175-5334.

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Trombidiformes: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

The Trombidiformes are a large, diverse order of mites.

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cc-by-sa-3.0
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Wikipedia authors and editors
original
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wikipedia EN