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Secoviridae

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Secoviridae is a family of viruses in the order Picornavirales. Plants serve as natural hosts. There are currently 81 species in this family, divided among 8 genera or not assigned to a genus.[1][2][3][4]

Structure

Viruses in Secoviridae are non-enveloped, with icosahedral geometries, and T=pseudo3 symmetry. The diameter is around 25-30 nm. Genomes are linear and segmented, bipartite, around 24-7kb in length.[1][2][3]

Genus Structure Symmetry Capsid Genomic arrangement Genomic segmentation Sequivirus Icosahedral Pseudo T=3 Non-enveloped Linear Monopartite Sadwavirus Icosahedral Pseudo T=3 Non-enveloped Linear Segmented Nepovirus Icosahedral Pseudo T=3 Non-enveloped Linear Segmented Fabavirus Icosahedral Pseudo T=3 Non-enveloped Linear Segmented Comovirus Icosahedral Pseudo T=3 Non-enveloped Linear Segmented Cheravirus Icosahedral Pseudo T=3 Non-enveloped Linear Segmented Torradovirus Icosahedral Pseudo T=3 Non-enveloped Linear Monopartite Waikavirus Icosahedral Pseudo T=3 Non-enveloped Linear Monopartite

Life cycle

Viral replication is cytoplasmic. Entry into the host cell is achieved by penetration into the host cell. Replication follows the positive stranded RNA virus replication model. Positive stranded RNA virus transcription is the method of transcription. The virus exits the host cell by tubule-guided viral movement. Plants serve as the natural host. Transmission routes are mechanical.[1][2][3]

Genus Host details Tissue tropism Entry details Release details Replication site Assembly site Transmission Sequivirus Plants None Viral movement; mechanical inoculation Viral movement Cytoplasm Cytoplasm Mechanical inoculation: aphids; Mechanical inoculation: Cavariella aegopodii; Mechanical inoculation: Cavariella pastinacae Sadwavirus Plants None Viral movement; mechanical inoculation Viral movement Cytoplasm Cytoplasm Nematodes; mites; thrips Nepovirus Plants None Viral movement; mechanical inoculation Viral movement Cytoplasm Cytoplasm Nematodes; mites; thrips Fabavirus Plants None Viral movement; mechanical inoculation Viral movement Cytoplasm Cytoplasm Mechanical inoculation: aphids Comovirus Plants None Viral movement; mechanical inoculation Viral movement Cytoplasm Cytoplasm Mechanical inoculation: beetles Cheravirus Plants None Viral movement; mechanical inoculation Viral movement Cytoplasm Cytoplasm Nematodes; mites; thrips Torradovirus Plants None Viral movement; mechanical inoculation Viral movement Cytoplasm Cytoplasm Unknown Waikavirus Gramineae Phloem; phloem parenchyma; bundle sheath Viral movement Viral movement Cytoplasm Cytoplasm Mechanical innocuation: aphids; mechanical innocuation: leafhoppers

Taxonomy

Group: ssRNA(+)

[1][2]

Evolution

The subfamily Comovirinae evolved ~1,000 years ago with extant species diversifying between 50 and 250 years ago.[5] This time period coincides with the intensification of agricultural practices in industrial societies.

The mutation rate has been estimated to be 9.29×10−3 to 2.74×10−3 subs/site/year.

References

  1. ^ a b c d Thompson, JR; Dasgupta, I; Fuchs, M; Iwanami, T; Karasev, AV; Petrzik, K; Sanfaçon, H; Tzanetakis, I; van der Vlugt, R; Wetzel, T; Yoshikawa, N; ICTV Report Consortium (April 2017). "ICTV Virus Taxonomy Profile: Secoviridae". The Journal of General Virology. 98 (4): 529–531. doi:10.1099/jgv.0.000779. PMC 5657025. PMID 28452295..mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output q{quotes:"""""'"'"}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-free a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-registration a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}
  2. ^ a b c d "Secoviridae". ICTV Online (10th) Report.
  3. ^ a b c "Viral Zone". ExPASy. Retrieved 15 June 2015.
  4. ^ ICTV. "Virus Taxonomy: 2014 Release". Retrieved 15 June 2015.
  5. ^ Thompson, JR; Kamath, N; Perry, KL (2014). "An evolutionary analysis of the secoviridae family of viruses". PLOS ONE. 9 (9): e106305. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0106305.

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Secoviridae: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Secoviridae is a family of viruses in the order Picornavirales. Plants serve as natural hosts. There are currently 81 species in this family, divided among 8 genera or not assigned to a genus.

license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN