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Lachnospiraceae

provided by wikipedia EN

The Lachnospiraceae are a family of anaerobic, spore-forming bacteria in the order Clostridiales that ferment diverse plant polysaccharides[11] to short-chain fatty acids (butyrate, acetate) and alcohols (ethanol). These bacteria are among the most abundant taxa in the rumen[12] and the human gut microbiota.[3][13][14][15] Members of this family may protect against colon cancer in humans by producing butyric acid.[16][17] Lachnospiraceae have been found to cause diabetes in germ-free mice.[18]

References

  1. ^ LPSN lpsn.dsmz.de
  2. ^ "Abyssivirga". www.uniprot.org.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n eol
  4. ^ "Agathobacter". www.uniprot.org.
  5. ^ "Cuneatibacter". www.uniprot.org.
  6. ^ Parker, Charles Thomas; Garrity, George M (1 January 2003). "Taxonomic Abstract for the genera". The NamesforLife Abstracts. doi:10.1601/tx.25197.
  7. ^ Parker, Charles Thomas; Garrity, George M (2017). "Nomenclature Abstract for Faecalicatena Sakamoto et al. 2016". The NamesforLife Abstracts. doi:10.1601/nm.29879.
  8. ^ Parker, Charles Thomas; Garrity, George M (2017). "Nomenclature Abstract for Faecalimonas Sakamoto et al. 2016". The NamesforLife Abstracts. doi:10.1601/nm.29877.
  9. ^ UniProt
  10. ^ "List of genera included in families - Lachnospiraceae". List of Prokaryotic Names with Standing in Nomenclature. Retrieved 26 June 2016.
  11. ^ Boutard, M; Cerisy, T (13 November 2014). "Functional Diversity of Carbohydrate-Active Enzymes Enabling a Bacterium to Ferment Plant Biomass". PLOS Genetics. 10 (11): e1004773. doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1004773. PMC 4230839. PMID 25393313.
  12. ^ Seshadri, R; Leahy, SC (19 March 2018). "Cultivation and sequencing of rumen microbiome members from the Hungate1000 Collection". Nature Biotechnology. 36 (4): 359–367. doi:10.1038/nbt.4110. PMC 6118326. PMID 29553575.
  13. ^ Phyllis Kanki; Darrell Jay Grimes, eds. (2013). Infectious diseases selected entries from the Encyclopedia of sustainability science and technology. New York: Springer. ISBN 978-1-4614-5719-0.
  14. ^ UniProt
  15. ^ Paul De Vos; et al., eds. (2009). Bergey's manual of systematic bacteriology (2nd ed.). Dordrecht: Springer. ISBN 978-0-387-68489-5.
  16. ^ Meehan, C. J.; Beiko, R. G. (12 March 2014). "A Phylogenomic View of Ecological Specialization in the Lachnospiraceae, a Family of Digestive Tract-Associated Bacteria". Genome Biology and Evolution. 6 (3): 703–713. doi:10.1093/gbe/evu050. PMC 3971600. PMID 24625961.
  17. ^ Xia, Li C.; Liu, Gang; Gao, Yingxin; Li, Xiaoxin; Pan, Hongfei; Ai, Dongmei (2019). "Identifying Gut Microbiota Associated With Colorectal Cancer Using a Zero-Inflated Lognormal Model". Frontiers in Microbiology. 10: 826. doi:10.3389/fmicb.2019.00826. ISSN 1664-302X. PMC 6491826. PMID 31068913.
  18. ^ Kameyama, Keishi; Itoh, Kikuji (2014). "Intestinal Colonization by a Lachnospiraceae Bacterium Contributes to the Development of Diabetes in Obese Mice". Microbes and Environments. 29 (4): 427–430. doi:10.1264/jsme2.ME14054. ISSN 1342-6311. PMC 4262368. PMID 25283478.
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Lachnospiraceae: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

The Lachnospiraceae are a family of anaerobic, spore-forming bacteria in the order Clostridiales that ferment diverse plant polysaccharides to short-chain fatty acids (butyrate, acetate) and alcohols (ethanol). These bacteria are among the most abundant taxa in the rumen and the human gut microbiota. Members of this family may protect against colon cancer in humans by producing butyric acid. Lachnospiraceae have been found to cause diabetes in germ-free mice.

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