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Methylocystaceae

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The Methylocystaceae are a family of bacteria that are capable of obtaining carbon and energy from methane.[3] Such bacteria are called methanotrophs, and in particular the Methylocystaceae comprise the type II methanotrophs, which are structurally and biochemically distinct from the Methylococcaceae or type I methanotrophs.

In this family methane is oxidized to form formaldehyde, which is assimilated by the serine pathway. This involves combining formaldehyde and glycine to form serine, which may be converted into glyceraldehyde and thus into other organic molecules. They can also fix nitrogen, like many other members of the order Rhizobiales. The cells contained paired internal membranes which are arranged towards their periphery.

References

  1. ^ a b "Methylocystaceae". www.uniprot.org..mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output q{quotes:"""""'"'"}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-free a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-registration a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}
  2. ^ "List of Prokaryotic Names with Standing in Nomenclature". Archived from the original on 27 April 2012. Retrieved 20 July 2010.
  3. ^ Nazaries, L.; Murrel, J.C.; Millard, P.; Baggs, L.; Singh, B.K. (2013). "Methane, microbes and models: fundamental understanding of the soil methane cycle for future predictions". Environmental Microbiology. 15 (9): 2395&ndash, 2417. https://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1462-2920.12149. doi:10.1111/1462-2920.12149.


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Methylocystaceae: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

The Methylocystaceae are a family of bacteria that are capable of obtaining carbon and energy from methane. Such bacteria are called methanotrophs, and in particular the Methylocystaceae comprise the type II methanotrophs, which are structurally and biochemically distinct from the Methylococcaceae or type I methanotrophs.

In this family methane is oxidized to form formaldehyde, which is assimilated by the serine pathway. This involves combining formaldehyde and glycine to form serine, which may be converted into glyceraldehyde and thus into other organic molecules. They can also fix nitrogen, like many other members of the order Rhizobiales. The cells contained paired internal membranes which are arranged towards their periphery.

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