dcsimg

Reproduction

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Key Reproductive Features: gonochoric/gonochoristic/dioecious (sexes separate); sexual

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bibliographic citation
1999. "Phyllostomidae" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Phyllostomidae.html
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Behavior

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Perception Channels: tactile ; chemical

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1999. "Phyllostomidae" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Phyllostomidae.html
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Morphology

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Other Physical Features: endothermic ; bilateral symmetry

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1999. "Phyllostomidae" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Phyllostomidae.html
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Leaf-nosed bat

provided by wikipedia EN

The New World leaf-nosed bats (Phyllostomidae) are found from southern North America to South America, specifically from Mexico to northern Argentina. They are ecologically the most varied and diverse family within the order Chiroptera. Most species are insectivorous, but the phyllostomid bats include within their number true predatory species as well as frugivores (subfamily Stenodermatinae and Carolliinae). For example, the false vampire (Vampyrum spectrum), the largest bat in the Americas, eats vertebrate prey including small dove-sized birds. Members of this family have evolved to use food groups such as fruit, nectar, pollen, insects, frogs, other bats, and small vertebrates, and, in the case of the vampire bats, even blood.

Both the scientific and common names derive from their often large, lance-shaped noses, greatly reduced in some of the nectar- and pollen-feeders. Because these bats echolocate nasally, this "nose-leaf" is thought to serve some role in modifying and directing the echolocation call. Similar nose-leaves are found in some other groups of bats, most notably the Old World leaf-nosed bats.

New World leaf-nosed bats are usually brown, grey, or black, although one species is white. They range in size from 4 to 13.5 cm (1.6 to 5.3 in) in head-body length, and can weigh from 7 to 200 g (0.25 to 7.05 oz). Most roost in fairly small groups within caves, animal burrows, or hollow trees, although some species aggregate in colonies of several hundred individuals.[1] They do not hibernate, although some species have been reported to aestivate.[2][3]

Classification

The 192 described species within 56 genera are:

FAMILY PHYLLOSTOMIDAE

References

 src= Wikimedia Commons has media related to Phyllostomidae.  src= Wikispecies has information related to Phyllostomidae
  1. ^ Garbino, Guilherme S. T.; Tavares, Valéria da Cunha. "Roosting ecology of Stenodermatinae bats (Phyllostomidae): evolution of foliage roosting and correlated phenotypes". Mammal Review: n/a–n/a. doi:10.1111/mam.12114. ISSN 1365-2907..mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output q{quotes:"""""'"'"}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-free a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-registration a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}
  2. ^ Macdonald, D., ed. (1984). The Encyclopedia of Mammals. New York: Facts on File. p. 805. ISBN 0-87196-871-1.
  3. ^ Wetterer, Andrea L.; et al. (2000). "Phylogeny of Phyllostomid Bats (Mammalia: Chiroptera): Data from Diverse Morphological Systems, Sex Chromosomes, and Restriction Sites". Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History. 248 (1): 1–200. doi:10.1206/0003-0090(2000)248<0001:POPBMC>2.0.CO;2.
  4. ^ a b c Turvey, S.T. (2009). Holocene mammal extinctions. In: Turvey, S.T. (editor) (2009). Holocene Extinctions. Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK.
  5. ^ Turvey, S. 2008. Desmodus draculae. Archived 2016-03-05 at the Wayback Machine. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Downloaded on 02 March 2016.
  6. ^ Suárez, W. 2005. Taxonomic status of the Cuban vampire bat (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae: Desmodontinae: Desmodus). Caribbean Journal of Science 41(4):761-767.
  7. ^ Don E. Wilson & DeeAnn M. Reeder (editors). 2005. Mammal Species of the World. A Taxonomic and Geographic Reference (3rd ed), Johns Hopkins University Press, 2,142 pp.
  8. ^ Barquez, R., Perez, S., Miller, B. & Diaz, M. 2015. Desmodus rotundus. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Downloaded on 02 March 2016.
  9. ^ Knox Jones JR, J. (1958). Pleistocene Bats from San Josecito Cave, Nuevo Leon, Mexico. University of Kansas Publications, Museum of Natural History, Volume 9, No. 14, pp. 389-396, December 19, 1958. (Available online)
  10. ^ Jarrin-V, P.; Kunz, T. H. (2011). "A new species of Sturnira (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae) from the Choco forest of Ecuador" (PDF). Zootaxa. 2755: 1–35.
Chiroptera families
Yinpterochiroptera
(Pteropodiformes)
Yangochiroptera
(Vespertilioniformes)
Extant species of family Phyllostomidae
BrachyphyllinaeBrachyphylla CarolliinaeCarollia
(Short-tailed
leaf-nosed bats)
Rhinophylla Desmodontinae
(vampire bats)Desmodus Diaemus Diphylla PhyllonycterinaeErophylla Phyllonycteris
Subfamily Glossophaginae
GlossophaginiAnoura
(Geoffroy's
long-nosed bats)
Choeroniscus Choeronycteris Dryadonycteris Glossophaga Hylonycteris Leptonycteris
(Saussure's
long-nosed bats)
Lichonycteris Monophyllus Musonycteris Scleronycteris HsunycteriniHsunycteris LonchophylliniLionycteris Lonchophylla Platalina Xeronycteris
Subfamily Phyllostominae
MicronycteriniGlyphonycteris Lampronycteris Macrotus
(big-eared bats) Micronycteris
(Little Big-eared
Bats)
Neonycteris Trinycteris VampyriniChrotopterus Lophostoma Tonatia
(round-eared bats) Trachops Vampyrum LonchorhininiLonchorhina
(sword-nosed bats) Macrophyllum Mimon
(Gray's Spear-nosed
Bats)
PhyllostomatiniPhylloderma Phyllostomus
(spear-nosed bats)
Subfamily Stenodermatinae
Ametrida Ardops Ariteus Artibeus
(Neotropical Fruit Bats) Centurio Chiroderma
(big-eyed bats) Dermanura Ectophylla Enchisthenes Mesophylla Phyllops
(Falcate-winged bats) Platyrrhinus Pygoderma Sphaeronycteris Stenoderma Sturnira
(yellow-shouldered bats)
Uroderma
(Tent-building bats) Vampyressa
(yellow-eared bats) Vampyriscus Vampyrodes
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Leaf-nosed bat: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

The New World leaf-nosed bats (Phyllostomidae) are found from southern North America to South America, specifically from Mexico to northern Argentina. They are ecologically the most varied and diverse family within the order Chiroptera. Most species are insectivorous, but the phyllostomid bats include within their number true predatory species as well as frugivores (subfamily Stenodermatinae and Carolliinae). For example, the false vampire (Vampyrum spectrum), the largest bat in the Americas, eats vertebrate prey including small dove-sized birds. Members of this family have evolved to use food groups such as fruit, nectar, pollen, insects, frogs, other bats, and small vertebrates, and, in the case of the vampire bats, even blood.

Both the scientific and common names derive from their often large, lance-shaped noses, greatly reduced in some of the nectar- and pollen-feeders. Because these bats echolocate nasally, this "nose-leaf" is thought to serve some role in modifying and directing the echolocation call. Similar nose-leaves are found in some other groups of bats, most notably the Old World leaf-nosed bats.

 src= Vampire bat

New World leaf-nosed bats are usually brown, grey, or black, although one species is white. They range in size from 4 to 13.5 cm (1.6 to 5.3 in) in head-body length, and can weigh from 7 to 200 g (0.25 to 7.05 oz). Most roost in fairly small groups within caves, animal burrows, or hollow trees, although some species aggregate in colonies of several hundred individuals. They do not hibernate, although some species have been reported to aestivate.

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wikipedia EN