dcsimg
Reproduction
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Key Reproductive Features: gonochoric/gonochoristic/dioecious (sexes separate); sexual

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Myers, P. 2001. "Acrobatidae" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Acrobatidae.html
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Acrobatidae/reproduction
Behavior
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Perception Channels: tactile ; chemical

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Myers, P. 2001. "Acrobatidae" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Acrobatidae.html
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Morphology
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Other Physical Features: endothermic ; bilateral symmetry

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Myers, P. 2001. "Acrobatidae" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Acrobatidae.html
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Acrobatidae
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The Acrobatidae are a small family of gliding marsupials containing two genera, each with a single species, the feathertail glider (Acrobates pygmaeus) from Australia and feather-tailed possum (Distoechurus pennatus) from New Guinea.

This family of the order Diprotodontia, which can be found in the east coast and inland of Australia and in some islands of New Guinea, is characterized by their very small size, which has side effects: because their mass-to-surface-area ratio is so small, heat escapes quicker from their bodies than it would in larger animals (the larger the mass-to-surface-area ratio, the harder it is to get rid of heat). Therefore, when temperature drops or food is scarce, they have trouble maintaining their body temperature and they enter a state known as torpidity (not to be confused with hibernation, which is not known in marsupials) which can last between one day and two weeks. In this state, the animal's breathing slows down, its temperature drops to almost that of its surroundings, and the animal becomes unresponsive.

Taxonomy

References

  • Groves, C.P. (2005). Wilson, D.E.; Reeder, D.M., eds. Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and Geographic Reference (3rd ed.). Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. p. 56. ISBN 0-801-88221-4. OCLC 62265494..mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output q{quotes:"""""'"'"}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-free a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-registration a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}
Extant Diprotodontia species
Suborder Vombatiformes
PhascolarctidaePhascolarctos Vombatidae
(Wombats)Vombatus Lasiorhinus
Suborder Phalangeriformes (Possums) (cont. below)
Phalangeridae
(including Cuscuses)Ailurops
(Bear cuscuses) Phalanger Spilocuscus Strigocuscus Trichosurus
(Brushtail possums) Wyulda Burramyidae
(Pygmy possums)Burramys Cercartetus
Suborder Phalangeriformes (Possums) (cont. above)
TarsipedidaeTarsipes PetauridaeDactylopsila Gymnobelideus Petaurus PseudocheiridaeHemibelideus Petauroides Petropseudes Pseudocheirus Pseudochirulus Pseudochirops AcrobatidaeAcrobates Distoechurus
Suborder Macropodiformes (cont. below)
Macropodidae
(includes Wallabies)Lagostrophus Dendrolagus
(Tree-kangaroos) Dorcopsis Dorcopsulus Lagorchestes Macropus
(includes Kangaroos
and Wallaroos)
Onychogalea
(Nail-tail wallabies) Petrogale
(Rock-wallabies) Setonix Thylogale
(Pademelons) Wallabia
Suborder Macropodiformes (cont. above)
PotoroidaeAepyprymnus Bettongia
(Bettongs) Potorous
(Potoroos) HypsiprymnodontidaeHypsiprymnodon


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Acrobatidae: Brief Summary
provided by wikipedia EN

The Acrobatidae are a small family of gliding marsupials containing two genera, each with a single species, the feathertail glider (Acrobates pygmaeus) from Australia and feather-tailed possum (Distoechurus pennatus) from New Guinea.

This family of the order Diprotodontia, which can be found in the east coast and inland of Australia and in some islands of New Guinea, is characterized by their very small size, which has side effects: because their mass-to-surface-area ratio is so small, heat escapes quicker from their bodies than it would in larger animals (the larger the mass-to-surface-area ratio, the harder it is to get rid of heat). Therefore, when temperature drops or food is scarce, they have trouble maintaining their body temperature and they enter a state known as torpidity (not to be confused with hibernation, which is not known in marsupials) which can last between one day and two weeks. In this state, the animal's breathing slows down, its temperature drops to almost that of its surroundings, and the animal becomes unresponsive.

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