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Brief Summary

provided by Catalog of Hymenoptera in America North of Mexico
This family differs from all other bees in that the females line their cells with a cellophane-like substance. The glossa is short, usually truncate or bifid, and this wasp-like feature is the primary basis for considering the Colletidae to be the most primitive family of living bees. Although the Colletidae are found throughout much of the world, the family is especially abundant and diverse in the southern hemisphere being exceptionally well represented in Australia by a large fauna consisting chiefly of the subfamilies Colletinae (Paracolletini), Euryglossinae and Hylaeinae. ~In North America the family is represented by four subfamilies of which the nominate tribe of the Colletinae (Colletes) and the Hylaeinae (Hylaeus) comprise the largest assemblage of the family in America north of Mexico. Only a single species of the Paracolletini (Eulonchopria punctatissima Michener) is known to range north of Mexico into the United States (Arizona). The other two subfamilies present in North America are the Xeromelissinae and Diphaglossinae which occur only in the New World and are chiefly centered in the Neotropical Region. Representatives of these subfamilies have been found as far north as southern Mexico (Xeromelissinae) and the southern United States (Diphaglossinae). ~While most of the species in America north of Mexico depend upon a comparatively wide variety of flowers for nectar and pollen, the females of a number of species of Colletes are either oligoleges or exhibit narrow polylectic tendencies.
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Catalog of Hymenoptera in America North of Mexico. 1979. Prepared cooperatively by specialists on the various groups of Hymenoptera under the direction of Karl V. Krombein and Paul D. Hurd, Jr., Smithsonian Institution, and David R. Smith and B. D. Burks, Systematic Entomology Laboratory, Insect Identification and Beneficial Insect Introduction Institute. Science and Education Administration, United States Department of Agriculture.

Colletidae

provided by wikipedia EN

The Colletidae are a family of bees, and are often referred to collectively as plasterer bees or polyester bees, due to the method of smoothing the walls of their nest cells with secretions applied with their mouthparts; these secretions dry into a cellophane-like lining. The five subfamilies, 54 genera, and over 2000 species are all evidently solitary, though many nest in aggregations. Two of the subfamilies, Euryglossinae and Hylaeinae, lack the external pollen-carrying apparatus (the scopa) that otherwise characterizes most bees, and instead carry the pollen in their crops. These groups, and most genera in this family, have liquid or semiliquid pollen masses on which the larvae develop.

They can be found all over the world, but the most species live in South America and Australia. Over 50% of all bee species living in Australia belong to this family. Only the genera Colletes and Hylaeus can be found in Europe, while in North America, in addition to these two, the genera Caupolicana, Eulonchopria, and Ptiloglossa are found.

Australian genera include Euhesma, a large genus, members of which has been split off into other genera such as Euryglossa and Callohesma.[1]

Traditionally, this family is believed to be likely the most "primitive" among extant bees, based primarily on the similarities of their mouthparts (the unique possession among bees of a bilobed glossa) to those of Crabronidae (the putative ancestors of bees), but recent molecular studies have disproved this hypothesis, placing the Melittidae (sensu lato) as the basal group of bees.[2]

"Nocturnal" species

The Colletidae are one of the four bee families that contain some crepuscular species (of both the "vespertine" and "matinal" types). These bees, as is typical in such cases, have greatly enlarged ocelli. The other families with some crepuscular species are Andrenidae, Halictidae, and Apidae.

Systematics

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Hylaeus sp. on Allium flower.

References

  1. ^ Michener, Duncan Charles (2000). The bees of the world. JHU Press. pp. 216–7. ISBN 978-0-8018-6133-8. Retrieved 8 December 2010.
  2. ^ Danforth, B.N.; Sipes, S.; Fang, J.; Brady, S.G. (2006). "The history of early bee diversification based on five genes plus morphology". Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 103 (41): 15118–23. Bibcode:2006PNAS..10315118D. doi:10.1073/pnas.0604033103. PMC 1586180. PMID 17015826.
  3. ^ "Encyclopedia of Life entry for Hylaeinae". Retrieved 3 December 2014.

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Colletidae: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

The Colletidae are a family of bees, and are often referred to collectively as plasterer bees or polyester bees, due to the method of smoothing the walls of their nest cells with secretions applied with their mouthparts; these secretions dry into a cellophane-like lining. The five subfamilies, 54 genera, and over 2000 species are all evidently solitary, though many nest in aggregations. Two of the subfamilies, Euryglossinae and Hylaeinae, lack the external pollen-carrying apparatus (the scopa) that otherwise characterizes most bees, and instead carry the pollen in their crops. These groups, and most genera in this family, have liquid or semiliquid pollen masses on which the larvae develop.

They can be found all over the world, but the most species live in South America and Australia. Over 50% of all bee species living in Australia belong to this family. Only the genera Colletes and Hylaeus can be found in Europe, while in North America, in addition to these two, the genera Caupolicana, Eulonchopria, and Ptiloglossa are found.

Australian genera include Euhesma, a large genus, members of which has been split off into other genera such as Euryglossa and Callohesma.

Traditionally, this family is believed to be likely the most "primitive" among extant bees, based primarily on the similarities of their mouthparts (the unique possession among bees of a bilobed glossa) to those of Crabronidae (the putative ancestors of bees), but recent molecular studies have disproved this hypothesis, placing the Melittidae (sensu lato) as the basal group of bees.

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cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
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wikipedia EN