Phlaeothripidae

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Phlaeothripidae is a family of thrips with hundreds of genera. They are the only extant family of the suborder Tubulifera, alongside the extinct family Rohrthripidae and are themselves ordered into two subfamilies, the Idolothripinae with 80 genera, and the Phlaeothripinae with almost 400. Some 3,400 species are recognised in this family, and many are fungivores living in the tropics.[1]

Thrips from this family are fairly common, and are generally larger than those in the suborder Terebrantia (containing all other thrips). Idolothrips marginatus can attain a body length of up to 14 mm. The group is distinguished by having the last abdominal segment modified into a tube-like structure – hence the suborder's name, which means "tube-bearers".

Selected species

Some of the better-known species are:

References

  1. ^ Moritz, G., D. Morris, and L. Mound. 2001. ThripsID: pest thrips of the world. ACIAR and CSIRO Publishing, Collingwood.

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Phlaeothripidae: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Phlaeothripidae is a family of thrips with hundreds of genera. They are the only extant family of the suborder Tubulifera, alongside the extinct family Rohrthripidae and are themselves ordered into two subfamilies, the Idolothripinae with 80 genera, and the Phlaeothripinae with almost 400. Some 3,400 species are recognised in this family, and many are fungivores living in the tropics.

Thrips from this family are fairly common, and are generally larger than those in the suborder Terebrantia (containing all other thrips). Idolothrips marginatus can attain a body length of up to 14 mm. The group is distinguished by having the last abdominal segment modified into a tube-like structure – hence the suborder's name, which means "tube-bearers".

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cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
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