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Brief Summary

provided by Catalog of Hymenoptera in America North of Mexico
Commonly called webspinning sawflies, the larvae live solitarily or socially in a web or in a rolled leaf held by silk. The subfamily Cephalciinae is associated with conifers, and the subfamily Pamphiliinae is associated with deciduous trees or shrubs. Adults of most species are large, dorsoventrally flattened insects, and are sometimes common around the flowers of their host plants in the spring.
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Catalog of Hymenoptera in America North of Mexico. 1979. Prepared cooperatively by specialists on the various groups of Hymenoptera under the direction of Karl V. Krombein and Paul D. Hurd, Jr., Smithsonian Institution, and David R. Smith and B. D. Burks, Systematic Entomology Laboratory, Insect Identification and Beneficial Insect Introduction Institute. Science and Education Administration, United States Department of Agriculture.

Pamphiliidae

provided by wikipedia EN

Pamphiliidae (sometimes incorrectly spelled Pamphilidae) is a small wasp family within Symphyta, containing some 200 species from the temperate regions of North America and Eurasia. The larvae feed on plants (often conifers), using silk to build webs or tents, or to roll leaves into tubes in which they feed, thus earning them the common names leaf-rolling sawflies or web-spinning sawflies. Some species are gregarious and the larvae live in large groups. Fossils of Pamphiliidae have been dated to the Jurassic period.[1]

They are distinguished from the closely related Megalodontesidae by their simple, filiform antennae.

Taxonomy

The family is currently divided into three subfamilies based on phylogenetic analysis of both extant and extinct species.[2]

References

  1. ^ Hymenoptera of the world : an identification guide to families. Goulet, Henri., Huber, John T. (John Theodore), Canada. Agriculture Canada. Research Branch. Ottawa, Ont.: Centre for Land and Biological Resources Research. 1993. ISBN 0-660-14933-8. OCLC 28024976.CS1 maint: others (link)
  2. ^ Wang, M.; Rasnitsyn, A.P.; Li, H.; Shih, C.; Sharkey, M.J.; Ren, D. (2015). "Phylogenetic analyses elucidate the inter‐relationships of Pamphilioidea (Hymenoptera, Symphyta)". Cladistics. 32 (3): 239–260. doi:10.1111/cla.12129.
  3. ^ Wang, M.; Shih, C.; Ren, D.; Rasnitsyn, A.P. (2014). "A new fossil genus in Pamphiliidae (Hymenoptera) from China". Alcheringa. 38 (3): 391–397. doi:10.1080/03115518.2014.884366.
  4. ^ Archibald, S.B.; Rasnitsyn, A.P. (2015). "New early Eocene Siricomorpha (Hymenoptera: Symphyta: Pamphiliidae, Siricidae, Cephidae) from the Okanagan Highlands, western North America". The Canadian Entomologist. 148 (2): 209–228. doi:10.4039/tce.2015.55.
  • Borror, D. J., DeLong, D. M., Triplehorn, C. A.(1976) cuarta edición. An introduction to the study of insects. Holt, Rinehart and Winston. New York, Chicago. ISBN 0-03-088406-3

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Pamphiliidae: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Pamphiliidae (sometimes incorrectly spelled Pamphilidae) is a small wasp family within Symphyta, containing some 200 species from the temperate regions of North America and Eurasia. The larvae feed on plants (often conifers), using silk to build webs or tents, or to roll leaves into tubes in which they feed, thus earning them the common names leaf-rolling sawflies or web-spinning sawflies. Some species are gregarious and the larvae live in large groups. Fossils of Pamphiliidae have been dated to the Jurassic period.

They are distinguished from the closely related Megalodontesidae by their simple, filiform antennae.

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