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Peripatid Velvet Worms

Peripatidae Evans 1901

Peripatidae

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Peripatidae is a family of velvet worms.[1] The oldest putative representatives of the family herald from Burmese amber dated to the mid-Cretaceous, around 100 Ma, with representatives from Dominican and Baltic amber attesting to a broader distribution in the Palaeogene / Neogene; molecular variability suggests that the family's crown group may have arisen in the early Mesozoic.[2]

Description

The Peripatidae exhibit a range of derivative features. They are longer, on average, than the Peripatopsidae and also have more leg pairs. The number of leg pairs in the Peripatidae range from 19 (in Typhloperipatus williamsoni[3]) to 43 (in Plicatoperipatus jamaicensis[4]).[5][6] The gonopore is always between the penultimate leg pair.[5] There are no oviparous species—the overwhelming majority are viviparous. The females of many viviparous species develop a placenta with which to provide the growing embryo with nutrients.

Distribution

The Peripatidae are restricted to the tropical and subtropical zones; in particular, they inhabit Central America, northern South America, Gabon, Northeast India, and Southeast Asia.[7]

Taxonomy

Neopatida

Neopatida is a monophyletic lineage within the Peripatidae, comprising all peripatids except the few found outside of the Americas.[8] The excluded peripatid genera are the southeast Asian Cretoperipatus and Eoperipatus, the African Mesoperipatus, and the northeast Indian Typhloperipatus.

Genera

The family consists of the following genera:

References

  1. ^ Oliveira, I.; Hering, L. & Mayer, G. "Updated Onychophora checklist". Onychophora Website. Retrieved 24 November 2016.
  2. ^ Murienne, J.; Daniels, S. R.; Buckley, T. R.; Mayer, G.; Giribet, G. (2013). "A living fossil tale of Pangaean biogeography". Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. 281 (1775): 20132648. doi:10.1098/rspb.2013.2648. PMC 3866409. PMID 24285200.
  3. ^ Kemp, Stanley (1914). "Onychophora". Records of the Indian Museum. 8: 471–492 – via Biodiversity Heritage Library.
  4. ^ Yang, Jie; Ortega-Hernández, Javier; Gerber, Sylvain; Butterfield, Nicholas J.; Hou, Jin-bo; Lan, Tian; Zhang, Xi-guang (2015-07-14). "A superarmored lobopodian from the Cambrian of China and early disparity in the evolution of Onychophora". Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. 112 (28): 8678–8683. doi:10.1073/pnas.1505596112. ISSN 0027-8424. PMID 26124122 – via ResearchGate.
  5. ^ a b Giribet, Gonzalo; Edgecombe, Gregory D. (2020-03-03). 30. Onychophora. Princeton University Press. doi:10.1515/9780691197067-032. ISBN 978-0-691-19706-7.
  6. ^ Mayer, Georg (2007-04-05). "Metaperipatus inae sp. nov. (Onychophora: Peripatopsidae) from Chile with a novel ovarian type and dermal insemination". Zootaxa. 1440 (1): 21–37. doi:10.11646/zootaxa.1440.1.2. ISSN 1175-5334 – via ResearchGate.
  7. ^ Oliveira, I. S.; Read, V. M. S. J.; Mayer, G. (2012). "A world checklist of Onychophora (velvet worms), with notes on nomenclature and status of names". ZooKeys (211): 1–70. doi:10.3897/zookeys.211.3463. PMC 3426840. PMID 22930648.
  8. ^ Costa, Cristiano Sampaio; Giribet, Gonzalo (2021-05-25). "Panamanian velvet worms in the genus Epiperipatus, with notes on their taxonomy and distribution and the description of a new species (Onychophora, Peripatidae)". Invertebrate Biology. 140 (3). doi:10.1111/ivb.12336. ISSN 1077-8306.
  9. ^ Barquero-González, Sánchez-Vargas, Morera (2020). "A new giant velvet worm from Costa Rica suggests absence of the genus Peripatus (Onychophora: Peripatidae) in Central America". Revista de Biología Tropical. 68: 300–320. doi:10.15517/rbt.v68i1.37675. S2CID 212697088.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
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Peripatidae: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Peripatidae is a family of velvet worms. The oldest putative representatives of the family herald from Burmese amber dated to the mid-Cretaceous, around 100 Ma, with representatives from Dominican and Baltic amber attesting to a broader distribution in the Palaeogene / Neogene; molecular variability suggests that the family's crown group may have arisen in the early Mesozoic.

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