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Brief Summary

    Inocybe bongardii: Brief Summary
    provided by wikipedia

    Inocybe bongardii is an agaric fungus in the family Inocybaceae. It was originally described as a species of Agaricus by German botanist Johann Anton Weinmann in 1836. Lucien Quélet transferred it to the genus Inocybe in 1872. It is a common species with a widespread distribution. Fruit bodies grow on the ground, often in clay soils, and typically with broadleaf trees. The fruit bodies are suspected to be toxic, as they contain muscarine.

Comprehensive Description

    Inocybe bongardii
    provided by wikipedia

    Inocybe bongardii is an agaric fungus in the family Inocybaceae. It was originally described as a species of Agaricus by German botanist Johann Anton Weinmann in 1836.[2] Lucien Quélet transferred it to the genus Inocybe in 1872.[3] It is a common species with a widespread distribution. Fruit bodies grow on the ground, often in clay soils, and typically with broadleaf trees.[4] The fruit bodies are suspected to be toxic, as they contain muscarine.[5]

    See also

    References

    1. ^ "GSD Species Synonymy: Inocybe bongardii (Weinm.) Quél". Index Fungorum. CAB International. Retrieved 2014-10-06..mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output q{quotes:"""""'"'"}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-free a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-registration a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}
    2. ^ Weinmann JA. (1836). Hymeno- et Gastero-Mycetes hucusque in imperio Rossico observatos (in Latin). St Petersburg: Inpensis Academiae Imperialis Scientiarum. p. 190.
    3. ^ Quélet L. (1872). "Les Champignons du Jura et des Vosges". Mémoires de la Société d'Émulation de Montbéliard. II (in French). 5: 319.
    4. ^ Courtecuisse R. (1999). Mushrooms of Britain and Europe. Collins Wildlife Trust Guides. London, UK: HarperCollins. pp. 501–2. ISBN 978-0-00-220012-7.
    5. ^ Barceloux DG. (2012). Medical Toxicology of Natural Substances: Foods, Fungi, Medicinal Herbs, Plants, and Venomous Animals. John Wiley & Sons. p. 765. ISBN 978-1-118-38276-9.