Boletus variipes

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Boletus variipes is a species of mycorrhizal bolete fungus in the family Boletaceae, native to North America. It was originally described by American mycologist Charles Horton Peck in 1888.[1]

A 2010 paper analyzing the genetic relationships within Boletus found that what was classified at the time as B. variipes was not monophyletic. Populations from east of the Rocky Mountains were sister to B. hiratsukae of Japan, with those from Central America and southeastern North America were sister to that combined lineage. This required the latter group to be renamed. A third population—from the Philippines—that has been known as B. variipes was more distantly related.[2]

Description

Boletus variipes is closely related to Boletus edulis, and is a dry, velvety to patchy tan or brown-gray mushroom with frequently prominent white to off-white reticulation on its darker brown stipe. It is often found under oaks (Quercus) and in mixed deciduous forests of aspen, maple and beech in eastern North America.

Taxonomy

First described by C. H. Peck in 1888,[1] with Boletus variipes var. fagicola described by Smith and Thiers in 1971.[3]

Identification

Boletus variipes has a broad, convex to almost flat cap between 6 and 20 cm, with a tendency to become cracked or finely patched in maturity, the flesh is white underside pore surface is white with pores which appear full when young, yellowing to olive as spores mature with a density of 1 to 2 pores per mm. The stipe is between 8 and 15 cm long and from 1 to 3.5 cm thick with slightly narrower ends or a widening base. The flesh of the cap and stipe does not discolor when cut or bruised. Spore prints are olive/brown.

Distribution

It is common throughout eastern North America and has been documented in Costa Rica.

Edibility

While its odor and taste are mild, the species is a choice edible mushroom.[4]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Peck CH. (1888). "Report of the Botanist (1887)". Annual Report on the New York State Museum of Natural History. 41: 51–122 (see p. 76).
  2. ^ Dentinger BT, Ammirati JF, Both EE, Desjardin DE, Halling RE, Henkel TW, Moreau PA, Nagasawa E, Soytong K, Taylor AF, Watling R, Moncalvo JM, McLaughlin DJ (2010). "Molecular phylogenetics of porcini mushrooms (Boletus section Boletus)" (PDF). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution. 57 (3): 1276–92. doi:10.1016/j.ympev.2010.10.004. PMID 20970511. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2013-05-23.
  3. ^ Alexander H. Smith and Harry D. Thiers "The boletes of Michigan (1971)" p 370 [1]
  4. ^ Phillips, Roger (2010). Mushrooms and Other Fungi of North America. Buffalo, NY: Firefly Books. p. 269. ISBN 978-1-55407-651-2.

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Boletus variipes: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Boletus variipes is a species of mycorrhizal bolete fungus in the family Boletaceae, native to North America. It was originally described by American mycologist Charles Horton Peck in 1888.

A 2010 paper analyzing the genetic relationships within Boletus found that what was classified at the time as B. variipes was not monophyletic. Populations from east of the Rocky Mountains were sister to B. hiratsukae of Japan, with those from Central America and southeastern North America were sister to that combined lineage. This required the latter group to be renamed. A third population—from the Philippines—that has been known as B. variipes was more distantly related.

license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN