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Xenasmataceae

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The Xenasmataceae are a family of crust fungi in the order Polyporales. The family was circumscribed in 1966 by German mycologist Franz Oberwinkler with Xenasma as the type genus.[3] As of April 2018, Index Fungorum accepts 28 species in the family.[4] Xenasmataceae fungi grow as saprobes on fallen wood and are known primarily from temperate areas.[5]

Description

Fruit bodies of Xenasmataceae fungi are usually crust-like, with a waxy or gelatinous texture. The fungi have a monomitic hyphal system, and the hyphae are frequently gelatinous. Spores are translucent, and often stain with Melzer's reagent.[5]

References

  1. ^ Parmasto, Erast (1968). Conspectus Systematis Corticiacearum (in Latin). Tartu, Estonia: Institutum zoologicum et botanicum Academiae scientiarum R.P.S.S. Estonicae. p. 58.
  2. ^ "Xenasmataceae Oberwinkler 1966". MycoBank. International Mycological Association. Retrieved 12 April 2012.
  3. ^ Oberwinkler, Franz (1965). "Primitive Basidiomyceten. Revision einiger Formenkreise von Basidienpilzen mit plastischer Basidie". Sydowia (in German). 19 (1–6): 1–72 (see p. 25).
  4. ^ Kirk, P.M. (ed.). "Species Fungorum (version 28th March 2018). In: Species 2000 & ITIS Catalogue of Life". Retrieved 9 April 2018.
  5. ^ a b Cannon, P.F.; Kirk, P.M. (2007). Fungal Families of the World. Wallingford, UK: CAB International. p. 379. ISBN 978-0-85199-827-5.
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Xenasmataceae: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

The Xenasmataceae are a family of crust fungi in the order Polyporales. The family was circumscribed in 1966 by German mycologist Franz Oberwinkler with Xenasma as the type genus. As of April 2018, Index Fungorum accepts 28 species in the family. Xenasmataceae fungi grow as saprobes on fallen wood and are known primarily from temperate areas.

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