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Distribution in Egypt

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Sinai (St.Katherine).

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Bibliotheca Alexandrina
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Bibliotheca Alexandrina

Global Distribution

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Europe, north Africa, west Asia.

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Bibliotheca Alexandrina
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Bibliotheca Alexandrina

Description

provided by eFloras
Prostrate or decumbent, perennial, basally woody herb. Branches stellate pubescent, densely so on young parts. Leaves orbicular, deeply cordate at base, 1-3 (-4) cm long, 1-4(-6) cm broad, simple-stellate hairy above, stellate below, crenate, occasionally shallowly 5-lobed;stipules ovate-lanceolate,c.5mm long, c. 2 mm broad, scarious, margin ciliate; petiole 3-12 (-25) cm long, stellate; pubescent, dense so above, glabrescent below. Flowers axillary, generally 3 on 4 in fascicles, occasionally solitary, particularly on the lower branches; pedicel (0.5-) 1-3 cm long, stellate pubescent. Epicalyx segments linear to linear-lanceolate, stellate pubescent, 3-4 mm long, c.l mm broad. Calyx free to the middle, 5-8 mm long, stellate pubescent; lobes 3-5 mm broad, deltoid or triangular. Petals 10-13 mm long, 3-4 mm broad, oblong-obovate, retuse, claw hairy on the margin, purplish or pinkish. Stamina] column 5-7 mm long, pubescent. Fruit depressed, 5-6 mm across; mericarps 13-15, pubescent, smooth margin usually rounded, 1.5-2 mm across in all directions. Seed dark brown, pubescent, reniform, 1 mm long and broad.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of Pakistan Vol. 0: 38 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Flora of Pakistan @ eFloras.org
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S. I. Ali & M. Qaiser
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Distribution

provided by eFloras
Distribution: Worldwide but of Old World origin. Naturalized in America. In Pakistan it widely occurs from plains to 14000 ft.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of Pakistan Vol. 0: 38 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of Pakistan @ eFloras.org
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S. I. Ali & M. Qaiser
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eFloras.org
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Derivation of specific name

provided by Flora of Zimbabwe
neglecta: overlooked
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Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings
bibliographic citation
Hyde, M.A., Wursten, B.T. and Ballings, P. (2002-2014). Malva neglecta Wallr. Flora of Zimbabwe website. Accessed 28 August 2014 at http://www.zimbabweflora.co.zw/speciesdata/species.php?species_id=138990
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Bart Wursten
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Petra Ballings
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Flora of Zimbabwe

Malva neglecta

provided by wikipedia EN

Malva neglecta is an annual growing to 0.6 m (2 ft). It is also known as common mallow in the United States and also buttonweed, cheeseplant, cheeseweed, dwarf mallow and roundleaf mallow.[2] This plant is often consumed as a food, with its leaves, stalks and seed all being considered edible.[3][4][5] This is especially true of the seeds, which contain 21% protein and 15.2% fat.[6]

Distribution

Native
Palearctic:
Macaronesia: Canary Islands
Northern Africa: Algeria, Morocco
Arabian Peninsula: Saudi Arabia
Western Asia: Afghanistan, Cyprus, Sinai, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Occupied Palestinian Territories, Syria, Turkey
Caucasus: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia
Soviet Middle Asia: Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan
Mongolia: Mongolia
China: Xinjiang
Indian Subcontinent: India, Pakistan
Northern Europe: Denmark, Ireland, Norway, Sweden, United Kingdom
Middle Europe: Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Germany, Hungary, Netherlands, Poland, Slovakia, Switzerland
Southeastern Europe: Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Greece, Italy, Montenegro, North Macedonia, Sardinia, Serbia, Slovenia, Romania,
Southwestern Europe: France, Portugal, Spain

Source:[1]

References

  1. ^ a b "Malva neglecta". Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN). Agricultural Research Service (ARS), United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). Retrieved 20 April 2017.
  2. ^ "Malva neglecta". Integrated Taxonomic Information System. Retrieved 9 May 2008.
  3. ^ Facciola S. Cornucopia – A Source Book of Edible Plants. Vista, Ca. Kampong Publications, 1990. 677 p.
  4. ^ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bdGAUejE8BM&feature=channel_page
  5. ^ http://www.pfaf.org/database/plants.php?Malva+neglecta
  6. ^ Duke JA. CRC Handbook of Proximate Analysis Tables of Higher Plants. Boca Raton, Fl. CRC Press, 1986. 389 p.

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Malva neglecta: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Malva neglecta is an annual growing to 0.6 m (2 ft). It is also known as common mallow in the United States and also buttonweed, cheeseplant, cheeseweed, dwarf mallow and roundleaf mallow. This plant is often consumed as a food, with its leaves, stalks and seed all being considered edible. This is especially true of the seeds, which contain 21% protein and 15.2% fat.

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