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Winter Squash

Cucurbita moschata (Duchesne) Duchesne ex Poir.

Description

provided by eFloras
Petiole without pungent hairs. Leaves 5-7-lobed, lobes acute, with whitish blotches on upper surface, valvety hairy, tendrils branched. Calyx segments spathulate or foliaceous. Fruiting peduncle stout, hard, 5-6-angled, expanded at the attachment to the fruit. Fruits of various size, shape and colour, usually oblong and constricted. Seeds greyish white or tan in colour, margin dark.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of Pakistan Vol. 0: 49 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Flora of Pakistan @ eFloras.org
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S. I. Ali & M. Qaiser
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eFloras.org
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Distribution

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Distribution: Cultivated throughout India, Pakistan, tropical and subtropical countries.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of Pakistan Vol. 0: 49 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of Pakistan @ eFloras.org
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S. I. Ali & M. Qaiser
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eFloras.org
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Brief Summary

provided by EOL authors
Cucurbita moschata, which encompasses various cultivars of pumpkin and winter squash, is a plant species in the gourd family (Cucurbitaceae) cultivated in warm areas around the world as food and animal fodder. Popular cultivars include butternut, winter crookneck, and cushaw, and numerous types developed in Japan and China. The names “winter squash” and “pumpkin” are also applied to the cultivars of C. maxima, C. mixta and C. pepo. Because the common names are used to refer to several different species, and those species may also have other common names, it can be difficult to ascertain which varieties are derived from which species. In the U.S., cultivars with round, orange fruits are generally referred to as pumpkins, while fruits with other shapes and colors are called winter squashes, regardless of the species. C. moschata likely originated in Mexico and Central America, and was already widely cultivated in North and South America before the arrival of Europeans. Archaeologists have found evidence of C. moschata in Peruvian sites dated from 4,000–3,000 B.C., and in Mexican sites from 1440–400 B.C., suggesting a long history of domestication and cultivation. C. moschata is better adapted to hot, humid climates than C. pepo and C. maxima, and is resistant to squash vine borers, Melittia cucurbitae, so these varieties are popular for cultivation in the southeastern U.S. A C. moschata variety, the Dickenson field pumpkin, is the dominant source of canned pumpkin (and, therefore, pumpkin pies) in the U.S. However, giant pumpkins, with fruits weighing over 45 kg (100 pounds) come from cultivars of C. maxima. C. moschata plants are frost-intolerant monoecious annuals. Stems are hairless or soft hairy, trailing or climbing vines growing to 3 meters. Leaves are simple, alternate, and shallowly lobed, often with white spots along the veins. The peduncle (stem that holds the fruit) is five-angled and flares outward where attached to the fruit. Fruits (technically referred to as pepos) are relatively large, with shapes ranging from globose to oblong to flattened. Seeds are 16–20 mm long. Winter squashes and pumpkins, which are low in calories and high in fiber and vitamin A, are usually eaten as a vegetable, in purees, soups, or pies. Seeds are high in protein, oil, and minerals, and are eaten raw, toasted, or pressed to make oil. Male flowers are coated with breading or batter and made into fritters. In South America, tips of young vines are boiled and eaten. C. moschata has numerous traditional medicinal uses in South and Central America. Seeds are toasted and eaten to kill worms and other intestinal parasites and used as a diuretic; a preparation from the flowers has been used to treat measles and smallpox. Pumpkin seeds are sometimes used as a natural worming agent for sheep and goats by organic farmers, but their efficacy has not been clearly demonstrated. World production of pumpkins, squashes, and gourds (across all species of Cucurbitaceae) was 22.1 million tons harvested from 1.7 million hectares in 2009, valued at $5.2 billion U.S. dollars. Leading producers were China, Russia, India, the U.S., and Egypt. (Ecocrop 2011, FAOSTAT 2011, Hui 2006, NRC 1989, Schoenian 2011, Schultes 1990, Whittaker and Davis 1962)
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Jacqueline Courteau
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Worldwide distribution

provided by Flora of Zimbabwe
Originally native to Central America or northern South America
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Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings
bibliographic citation
Hyde, M.A., Wursten, B.T. and Ballings, P. (2002-2014). Cucurbita moschata Duchesne ex Poir. Flora of Mozambique website. Accessed 28 August 2014 at http://www.mozambiqueflora.com/cult/species.php?species_id=186500
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Mark Hyde
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Bart Wursten
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Petra Ballings
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Cucurbita moschata

provided by wikipedia EN

Cucurbita moschata is a species originating in either Central America or northern South America.[2] It includes cultivars known as squash or pumpkin. C. moschata cultivars are generally more tolerant of hot, humid weather than cultivars of C. maxima or C. pepo. They also generally display a greater resistance to disease and insects, especially to the squash vine borer. Commercially made pumpkin pie mix is most often made from varieties of C. moschata. The ancestral species of the genus Cucurbita were present in the Americas before the arrival of humans. Evolutionarily speaking the genus is relatively recent in origin as no species within the genus is genetically isolated from all the other species. C. moschata acts as the genetic bridge within the genus and is closest to the genus' progenitor.[3]

Varieties

Cultivars include:

  • Al Hachi – a winter squash used in Kashmir, usually dried
  • Aehobak – a summer squash, also called Korean zucchini
  • Butternut squash – a popular winter squash in much of North America
  • Calabaza - a commonly grown winter squash in the Caribbean, tropical America, and the Philippines
  • Crookneck[4]
  • Dickinson pumpkinLibby's uses a proprietary strain of Dickinson for its canned pumpkin.[5][6]
  • Giromon - A large, green cultivar, grown primarily in the Caribbean. Haitians use it to make the traditional "soupe giromon".[7]
  • Golden Cushaw – Similar in shape but a different species than the common Cucurbita argyrosperma "cushaw" type.
  • Loche – a landrace of squashes from Peru.[8]
  • Long Island cheese pumpkin - the exterior resembles a wheel of cheese in shape, color, and texture
  • Musquée de Provence or Moscata di Provenza
  • Naples long squash
  • Seminole pumpkin - an heirloom variety originally cultivated by the Seminole Native Americans of Florida
  • Tromboncino - a summer squash, also known as "Zucchetta"[9]

Gallery

References

  1. ^ The Plant List, Cucurbita moschata
  2. ^ Hui, Yiu H. (2006). "Pumpkins and Squashes". Handbook of Food Science, Technology, and Engineering. 1. Boca Raton, Florida: CRC Press. pp. 20–10.
  3. ^ Whitaker, Thomas W.; Bemis, W. P. (1975). "Origin and Evolution of the Cultivated Cucurbita". Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club. New York: Torrey Botanical Society. 102 (6): 362–368. doi:10.2307/2484762. JSTOR 2484762.
  4. ^ Elisa Ludwig (19 November 2009). "Pumpkin Can Be So Much More Than Pie". The Inquirer. Retrieved 19 January 2013.
  5. ^ Robinson, R. W. "Squash and Pumpkin" (PDF). United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, National Plant Germplasm System. Archived from the original (PDF) on September 24, 2015. Retrieved November 23, 2014.
  6. ^ Stephens, James M. "Pumpkin — Cucurbita spp". University of Florida. Retrieved November 23, 2014.
  7. ^ West-Duran, Alan (2003). African Caribbeans: a reference guide. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press. p. 110. ISBN 0-313-31240-0.
  8. ^ Andres TC, R Ugás, F Bustamante. 2006. Loche: A unique pre-Columbian squash locally grown in North Coastal Peru. In: Proceedings of Cucurbitaceae 2006. G.J. Holmes (eds.) Universal Press, Raleigh, North Carolina, USA. pp. 333-340. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/237805567_Loche_a_Unique_Pre-Columbian_Squash_Locally_Grown_in_North_Coastal_Peru
  9. ^ "Zucchetta". Mount Vernon Northwestern Washington Research and Extension Center: Vegetable Research and Extension. Washington State University. Retrieved 10 May 2013.

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Cucurbita moschata: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Cucurbita moschata is a species originating in either Central America or northern South America. It includes cultivars known as squash or pumpkin. C. moschata cultivars are generally more tolerant of hot, humid weather than cultivars of C. maxima or C. pepo. They also generally display a greater resistance to disease and insects, especially to the squash vine borer. Commercially made pumpkin pie mix is most often made from varieties of C. moschata. The ancestral species of the genus Cucurbita were present in the Americas before the arrival of humans. Evolutionarily speaking the genus is relatively recent in origin as no species within the genus is genetically isolated from all the other species. C. moschata acts as the genetic bridge within the genus and is closest to the genus' progenitor.

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Wikipedia authors and editors
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wikipedia EN