dcsimg

Description

provided by eFloras
Herbs erect to procumbent, annual or short-lived perennial, usually with basal rosette. Stems 5-50(-100) cm tall, simple or branched, strigillose and often villous, often with glandular hairs on inflorescence. Leaves green, with inconspicuous veins, strigillose and villous, often also glandular puberulous, sessile to shortly petiolate; rosette blade 4-15 × 1-3 cm; cauline blade narrowly oblanceolate to lanceolate or narrowly elliptic, 2-10 × 0.5-3.5 cm, base narrowly cuneate, margin deeply lobed to dentate, apex acute. Inflorescence a lax open spike. Flowers open near sunset, one per stem per day; floral tube 1.2-3.5 cm, upcurved in bud. Sepals 5-15 mm, with free tips 0.3-3 mm, apical, spreading. Petals yellow to pale yellow, fading to orange, 5-22 mm. Anthers 2-6 mm; pollen ca. 50% fertile. Ovary strigillose, with spreading and sometimes a few glandular hairs; stigma surrounded by anthers. Capsules cylindric, 2-5 cm, sessile. Seeds in two rows per locule, brown to dark brown, ellipsoid to suborbicular, 0.9-1.8 mm, pitted. Fl. Apr-Sep(-Oct), fr. May-Oct. 2n = 14, permanent translocation heterozygote; self-compatible, autogamous.
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 13: 423, 425 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of China @ eFloras.org
editor
Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
project
eFloras.org
original
visit source
partner site
eFloras

Distribution

provided by eFloras
Fujian, Taiwan [Japan; native to E North America, naturalized in S Africa, Australia, Central America, Europe, and South America].
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 13: 423, 425 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of China @ eFloras.org
editor
Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
project
eFloras.org
original
visit source
partner site
eFloras

Habitat

provided by eFloras
Open, disturbed, usually sandy sites, often along coastal areas; near sea level to 400 m.
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 13: 423, 425 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of China @ eFloras.org
editor
Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
project
eFloras.org
original
visit source
partner site
eFloras

Synonym

provided by eFloras
Raimannia laciniata (Hill) Rose ex Britton & A. Brown.
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 13: 423, 425 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of China @ eFloras.org
editor
Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
project
eFloras.org
original
visit source
partner site
eFloras

Oenothera laciniata

provided by wikipedia EN

Oenothera laciniata is a species of flowering plant in the evening primrose family known by the common name cutleaf evening primrose. It is native to the eastern United States but it can be found in many other places as an introduced species and sometimes a noxious weed. It is reported from Hawaii, Australia, Britain, France, Korea, Japan, and other areas.[1] This is an annual or short-lived perennial herb producing a spreading stem from a hairy rosette of deeply cut or lobed leaves. Flowers occur in the axils of leaves higher on the stem. Each flower has pale to deep yellow petals up to about 2 centimeters long which fade orange, pink, or red with age. The fruit is a cylindrical capsule up to 5 centimeters in length.

References

 title=
license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN

Oenothera laciniata: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Oenothera laciniata is a species of flowering plant in the evening primrose family known by the common name cutleaf evening primrose. It is native to the eastern United States but it can be found in many other places as an introduced species and sometimes a noxious weed. It is reported from Hawaii, Australia, Britain, France, Korea, Japan, and other areas. This is an annual or short-lived perennial herb producing a spreading stem from a hairy rosette of deeply cut or lobed leaves. Flowers occur in the axils of leaves higher on the stem. Each flower has pale to deep yellow petals up to about 2 centimeters long which fade orange, pink, or red with age. The fruit is a cylindrical capsule up to 5 centimeters in length.

license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN