dcsimg

Comments

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Reportedly cultivated at Abbottabad (Hazara).
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of Pakistan Vol. 0: 9 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Flora of Pakistan @ eFloras.org
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S. I. Ali & M. Qaiser
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eFloras.org
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Comments

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The fruit are used medicinally for promoting diuresis.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 18: 215 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of China @ eFloras.org
editor
Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
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eFloras.org
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Description

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Small tree, up to 6 m tall. Leaves 3-lobed, cordate-ovate. Panicles many flowered, 10-16 cm long.
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cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of Pakistan Vol. 0: 9 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of Pakistan @ eFloras.org
editor
S. I. Ali & M. Qaiser
project
eFloras.org
original
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eFloras

Description

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Trees ca. 15 m tall; young branches sparsely pubescent. Leaves opposite or nearly so, sometimes whorled; petiole 6-18 cm; leaf blade broadly ovate, ca. 25 X 25 cm, scabrous, sparsely pubescent, or glabrescent, base cordate, margin entire or sinuolate, usually 3-lobed, apex acuminate; lateral veins 4-6 on each side of midrib, palmately 5-7-veined basally. Inflorescences paniculate, terminal; peduncle sparsely pubescent, 12-28 cm. Calyx bilabiate, 6-8 mm. Corolla campanulate, pale yellow, yellow 2-striate and purple spotted at throat, ca. 2.5 X 2 cm. Anthers divergent. Style filiform; stigma 2-lobed. Capsule linear, nodding, 20-30 cm X 5-7 mm. Seeds long ellipsoid, 6-8 X ca. 3 mm, villous at both ends. Fl. May-Jun, fr. Aug-Oct. 2n = 40*.
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 18: 215 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of China @ eFloras.org
editor
Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
project
eFloras.org
original
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eFloras

Distribution

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Distribution: A native of China. Cultivated elsewhere.
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cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of Pakistan Vol. 0: 9 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of Pakistan @ eFloras.org
editor
S. I. Ali & M. Qaiser
project
eFloras.org
original
visit source
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eFloras

Distribution

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Anhui, Gansu, Hebei, Heilongjiang, Henan, Hubei, Jiangsu, Jilin, Liaoning, Nei Mongol, Ningxia, Qinghai, Shaanxi, Shandong, Shanxi, Sichuan, Xinjinag [introduced elsewhere].
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 18: 215 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of China @ eFloras.org
editor
Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
project
eFloras.org
original
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eFloras

Flower/Fruit

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Fl.Per.: April-May.
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cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of Pakistan Vol. 0: 9 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of Pakistan @ eFloras.org
editor
S. I. Ali & M. Qaiser
project
eFloras.org
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eFloras

Habitat

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* Slopes; (500-)1900-2500 m.
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cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 18: 215 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of China @ eFloras.org
editor
Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
project
eFloras.org
original
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eFloras

Synonym

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Bignonia catalpa Thunberg; Catalpa henryi Dode; C. kaempferi Siebold & Zuccarini.
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cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 18: 215 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of China @ eFloras.org
editor
Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
project
eFloras.org
original
visit source
partner site
eFloras

Catalpa ovata

provided by wikipedia EN

Catalpa ovata, the yellow catalpa[1][5] or Chinese catalpa[1] (Chinese: ; pinyin: ), is a pod-bearing tree native to China. Compared to C. speciosa, it is much smaller, typically reaching heights between 20 and 30 feet (6 and 9 m). The inflorescences form 4–10-inch-long (100–250 mm) bunches of creamy white flowers with distinctly yellow tinging; individual flowers are about 1 inch (25 mm) wide. They bloom in July and August.[5] The leaves are very similar in shape to those of Paulownia tomentosa, having three lobes (two are abruptly truncated on either edge, with a third, central, slightly acute, pointed lobe forming the leaf apex), and are darkly green.[5][6] Fruits are very narrow, foot-long pods.[5]

Although native to the more temperate provinces within China (Anhui, Gansu, Hebei, Heilongjiang, Henan, Hubei, Jiangsu, Jilin, Liaoning, Nei Monggol, Ningxia, Qinghai, Shaanxi, Shandong, Shanxi, Sichuan, Xinjiang),[1] C. ovata is also cultivated in North America and Europe, and has become a parent of Catalpa × erubescens with the American species Catalpa bignonioides.[1][5] It is commonly used to make the undersides of qin.[7]

Chemistry

The plant contains dehydro-alpha-lapachone[8] (DAL) which inhibits vessel regeneration, interferes with vessel anastomosis, and limits plexus formation in zebrafish.[9] DAL also controlled the development of the fungi rice blast, tomato late blight, wheat leaf rust, barley powdery mildew and red pepper anthracnose (Colletotrichum coccodes (Wallr) S Hughes). The chemical was particularly effective in suppressing anthracnose.[10]

Other

Referenced in the Zhuangzi.[11]

References

  1. ^ a b c d e Gen. hist. 4:230. 1837 "Catalpa ovata". Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN). Agricultural Research Service (ARS), United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). Retrieved December 7, 2009.
  2. ^ a b Gen. Hist. iv. 230. Plant Name Details for Catalpa ovata. IPNI. Retrieved December 7, 2009. Notes: =Kaempferi
  3. ^ Abh. Akad. Muench. iv. III. (1846) 142. Plant Name Details for Catalpa kaempferi. 4. IPNI. Retrieved December 7, 2009. Notes: Japon
  4. ^ "Catalpa ovata - G.Don". Plants For A Future. Archived from the original on July 6, 2010. Retrieved December 7, 2009.
  5. ^ a b c d e Phillips, Roger (1978). Trees in Britain, Europe and North America. Cavaye Place, London, England: Pan Books Ltd. p. 96. ISBN 978-0-330-25480-9.
  6. ^ Phillips, Roger (1978). Trees in Britain, Europe and North America. Cavaye Place, London, England: Pan Books Ltd. p. 42. ISBN 978-0-330-25480-9.
  7. ^ Yeung, Juni (2010). Standards for the Guqin February 2010 Draft. Toronto: Toronto Guqin Society.
  8. ^ Dehydro-alpha-lapachone Archived 2012-04-02 at the Wayback Machine
  9. ^ Garkavtsev I, Chauhan VP, Wong HK, Mukhopadhyay A, Glicksman MA, Peterson RT, Jain RK.,"Dehydro-alpha-lapachone, a plant product with antivascular activity." Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. 2011 Jul 12;108(28):11596-601
  10. ^ Cho, JY; Kim, HY; Choi, GJ; Jang, KS; Lim, HK; Lim, CH; Cho, KY; Kim, JC (2006). "Dehydro-alpha-lapachone isolated from Catalpa ovata stems: Activity against plant pathogenic fungi". Pest Management Science. 62 (5): 414–8. doi:10.1002/ps.1180. PMID 16550502.
  11. ^ "Chinese Text Project Dictionary".

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Catalpa ovata: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Catalpa ovata, the yellow catalpa or Chinese catalpa (Chinese: 梓; pinyin: zǐ), is a pod-bearing tree native to China. Compared to C. speciosa, it is much smaller, typically reaching heights between 20 and 30 feet (6 and 9 m). The inflorescences form 4–10-inch-long (100–250 mm) bunches of creamy white flowers with distinctly yellow tinging; individual flowers are about 1 inch (25 mm) wide. They bloom in July and August. The leaves are very similar in shape to those of Paulownia tomentosa, having three lobes (two are abruptly truncated on either edge, with a third, central, slightly acute, pointed lobe forming the leaf apex), and are darkly green. Fruits are very narrow, foot-long pods.

Although native to the more temperate provinces within China (Anhui, Gansu, Hebei, Heilongjiang, Henan, Hubei, Jiangsu, Jilin, Liaoning, Nei Monggol, Ningxia, Qinghai, Shaanxi, Shandong, Shanxi, Sichuan, Xinjiang), C. ovata is also cultivated in North America and Europe, and has become a parent of Catalpa × erubescens with the American species Catalpa bignonioides. It is commonly used to make the undersides of qin.

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Tree in flower in cultivation at the Birmingham Botanical Gardens

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Leaves and pods

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Closeup of mature Catalpa ovata at sunset

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