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Cydnidae

provided by wikipedia EN

Cydnidae are a family of shield bugs, known by common names including burrowing bugs or burrower bugs.[2] In some older classifications, Cydnidae, sensu lato includes the subfamily Thyreocorinae (now part of the "Corimelaenidae"), which are known commonly as negro bugs (early name to be avoided), or ebony bugs, and/or the families Thaumastellidae and Parastrachiidae.[3][4] Though similar in appearance to a beetle at casual glance, they can be distinguished by both their piercing/sucking mouthparts, and wing configuration (beetle elytra are split directly down the back of the insect). Of some 750 species of burrower bugs, 27 are reported as crop pests, and six species are thought to feed on peanut.

In Goiás (Brazil) the flocks are observed in the rainy season, November to March, which coincide with the period in which adults of these insects are found in the soil. Currently the southwestern region of Goiás is the most attacked (Mineiros, Chapadão do Céu, Rio Verde and Jataí), south and southeast, in cotton, soybean, maize and pasture crops. Among the damages caused by the insect in the plant are: uneven growth of the plant, reduced growth, root lesions, large amount of dry leaves, reddish leaf, yellowing and subsequent dry; reduction of the stand, yellowing of the leaves and reduction of productivity.

Selected species

References

  1. ^ Jerzy A. Lis; Barbara Lis; Ernst Heiss (2018). "Chilamnestocoris mixtus gen. et spec. nov., the first burrower bug (Hemiptera: Pentatomoidea: Cydnidae) in Upper Cretaceous Burmese amber". Cretaceous Research. 91: 257–262. doi:10.1016/j.cretres.2018.06.017.
  2. ^ "Cydnidae". Discover Life. Retrieved 2007-03-09.
  3. ^ Dolling, W. R. (1981). "A rationalized classification of the burrower bugs (Cydnidae)". Systematic Entomology. 6 (1): 61–76. doi:10.1111/j.1365-3113.1981.tb00016.x.
  4. ^ Yao, Yunzhi; Ren, Dong; Rider, David A.; Cai, Wanzhi (2012). "Phylogeny of the Infraorder Pentatomomorpha Based on Fossil and Extant Morphology, with Description of a New Fossil Family from China". PLOS ONE. 7 (5): e37289. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0037289. PMC 3360028. PMID 22655038.

Template:NUNES JUNIOR, J.; FARIA, L. C. de; MONTEIRO, P. M. F. O.; ROCHA, M. R. da; FERNANDES, P. M., Embrapa Arroz e Feijão,2000

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Cydnidae: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Cydnidae are a family of shield bugs, known by common names including burrowing bugs or burrower bugs. In some older classifications, Cydnidae, sensu lato includes the subfamily Thyreocorinae (now part of the "Corimelaenidae"), which are known commonly as negro bugs (early name to be avoided), or ebony bugs, and/or the families Thaumastellidae and Parastrachiidae. Though similar in appearance to a beetle at casual glance, they can be distinguished by both their piercing/sucking mouthparts, and wing configuration (beetle elytra are split directly down the back of the insect). Of some 750 species of burrower bugs, 27 are reported as crop pests, and six species are thought to feed on peanut.

In Goiás (Brazil) the flocks are observed in the rainy season, November to March, which coincide with the period in which adults of these insects are found in the soil. Currently the southwestern region of Goiás is the most attacked (Mineiros, Chapadão do Céu, Rio Verde and Jataí), south and southeast, in cotton, soybean, maize and pasture crops. Among the damages caused by the insect in the plant are: uneven growth of the plant, reduced growth, root lesions, large amount of dry leaves, reddish leaf, yellowing and subsequent dry; reduction of the stand, yellowing of the leaves and reduction of productivity.

license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN