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Ursus maritimus tyrannus

provided by wikipedia EN

Ursus maritimus tyrannus (meaning tyrant polar bear) is an extinct subspecies of polar bear, known from a single fragmentary ulna found in the gravels of the Thames at Kew Bridge, London. It was named by the Finnish paleontologist Björn Kurtén in 1964 and is interpreted to represent a relatively large subadult individual: the ulna is estimated to have been 48.5 cm (19 in) long when complete,[1] for comparison, modern subadult polar bear ulnae are 36–43 cm (14–17 in) long.[1]

An unpublished reinvestigation of the fossil suggests that the fossil is actually a brown bear.[2]

References

  1. ^ a b Kurtén, B. (1964). "The evolution of the polar bear, Ursus maritimus Phipps". Acta Zoologica Fennica. 108: 1–26. hdl:10138/37762.
  2. ^ Ingólfsson, Ólafur; Wiig, Øystein (2009). "Late Pleistocene fossil find in Svalbard: the oldest remains of a polar bear (Ursus maritimus Phipps, 1744) ever discovered". Polar Research. 28 (3): 455. doi:10.1111/j.1751-8369.2008.00087.x.
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Ursus maritimus tyrannus: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Ursus maritimus tyrannus (meaning tyrant polar bear) is an extinct subspecies of polar bear, known from a single fragmentary ulna found in the gravels of the Thames at Kew Bridge, London. It was named by the Finnish paleontologist Björn Kurtén in 1964 and is interpreted to represent a relatively large subadult individual: the ulna is estimated to have been 48.5 cm (19 in) long when complete, for comparison, modern subadult polar bear ulnae are 36–43 cm (14–17 in) long.

An unpublished reinvestigation of the fossil suggests that the fossil is actually a brown bear.

license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
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wikipedia EN