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Sordariales

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The order Sordariales is one of the most diverse taxonomic groups within the Sordariomycetes (subdivision Pezizomycotina, division Ascomycota).[1]

Recent phylogenetic studies have aimed to contribute to the natural classification of this order.[2] Species in the order sordariales have a broad range of ecological diversity, containing lignicolous, herbicolous and coprophilous taxa.[3] The order furthermore contains a number of ecologically important species, including the model filamentous fungal genus podospora[4] and potentially industrial-relevant fungi. For example, the order Sordariales contains the highest diversity of thermophilic

fungal species, with isolates present in seven different genera.[5] Most Sordariales are saprobic, producing solitary perithecial ascomata. They are commonly found on dung or decaying plant matter.[6]

References

  1. ^ Huhndorf, Sabine M.; Miller, Andrew N.; Fernández, Fernando A. (2004-03-01). "Molecular systematics of the Sordariales: the order and the family Lasiosphaeriaceae redefined". Mycologia. 96 (2): 368–387. doi:10.1080/15572536.2005.11832982. ISSN 0027-5514. PMID 21148859. S2CID 21754902.
  2. ^ Marin-Felix, Yasmina; Miller, Andrew N.; Cano-Lira, José F.; Guarro, Josep; García, D.; Stadler, Marc; Huhndorf, Sabine M.; Stchigel, Alberto M. (September 2020). "Re-Evaluation of the Order Sordariales: Delimitation of Lasiosphaeriaceae s. str., and Introduction of the New Families Diplogelasinosporaceae, Naviculisporaceae, and Schizotheciaceae". Microorganisms. 8 (9): 1430. doi:10.3390/microorganisms8091430. PMC 7565071. PMID 32957559.
  3. ^ Huhndorf, Sabine M.; Miller, Andrew N.; Fernández, Fernando A. (2004-03-01). "Molecular systematics of the Sordariales: the order and the family Lasiosphaeriaceae redefined". Mycologia. 96 (2): 368–387. doi:10.1080/15572536.2005.11832982. ISSN 0027-5514. PMID 21148859. S2CID 21754902.
  4. ^ Ament-Velásquez, S. Lorena; Johannesson, Hanna; Giraud, Tatiana; Debuchy, Robert; Saupe, Sven J.; Debets, Alfons J. M.; Bastiaans, Eric; Malagnac, Fabienne; Grognet, Pierre; Peraza-Reyes, Leonardo; Gladieux, Pierre (2020-11-25). "The taxonomy of the model filamentous fungus Podospora anserina". MycoKeys. 75: 51–69. doi:10.3897/mycokeys.75.55968. ISSN 1314-4049. PMC 7710671. PMID 33281477.
  5. ^ Morgenstern, Ingo; Powlowski, Justin; Ishmael, Nadeeza; Darmond, Corinne; Marqueteau, Sandrine; Moisan, Marie-Claude; Quenneville, Geneviève; Tsang, Adrian (April 2012). "A molecular phylogeny of thermophilic fungi". Fungal Biology. 116 (4): 489–502. doi:10.1016/j.funbio.2012.01.010. PMID 22483047.
  6. ^ Kendrick, Bryce (2000). The Fifth Kingdom (3rd ed.). Focus Publishing. p. 59. ISBN 978-1-58510-022-4.
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Sordariales: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

The order Sordariales is one of the most diverse taxonomic groups within the Sordariomycetes (subdivision Pezizomycotina, division Ascomycota).

Recent phylogenetic studies have aimed to contribute to the natural classification of this order. Species in the order sordariales have a broad range of ecological diversity, containing lignicolous, herbicolous and coprophilous taxa. The order furthermore contains a number of ecologically important species, including the model filamentous fungal genus podospora and potentially industrial-relevant fungi. For example, the order Sordariales contains the highest diversity of thermophilic

fungal species, with isolates present in seven different genera. Most Sordariales are saprobic, producing solitary perithecial ascomata. They are commonly found on dung or decaying plant matter.

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cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
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wikipedia EN