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Sea toad

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The sea toads and coffinfishes are a family of deep-sea anglerfishes known as the Chaunacidae.[1]

These are bottom-dwelling fishes found on the continental slopes of the Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific Oceans,[2] at depths to at least 2,460 m (8,070 ft). Of the two genera in the family, Chaunacops typically occurs at deeper depths than Chaunax, but with considerable overlap.

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Chaunax pictus

They have large, globose bodies and short, compressed tails, and are covered with small, spiny scales. The largest are about 30 cm (12 in) in length. The first dorsal fin ray is modified into a short bioluminescent lure which dangles forward over the mouth, which is turned upwards so as to be nearly vertical. The sensory canals of the lateral lines are especially conspicuous.[3] Chaunax have modified fins which resemble legs.[4]

References

  1. ^ Froese, Rainer, and Daniel Pauly, eds. (2006). "Chaunacidae" in FishBase. February 2006 version.
  2. ^ Bertelsen, E. & Pietsch, T.W. (1998). Paxton, J.R. & Eschmeyer, W.N., eds. Encyclopedia of Fishes. San Diego: Academic Press. p. 140. ISBN 0-12-547665-5..mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output q{quotes:"""""'"'"}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-free a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-registration a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}
  3. ^ John H. Caruso (2005). "Chaunacidae". Tree of Life web project. Retrieved 3 April 2006.
  4. ^ http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/okeanos/explorations/ex1502/logs/apr13/apr13.html


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Sea toad: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

The sea toads and coffinfishes are a family of deep-sea anglerfishes known as the Chaunacidae.

These are bottom-dwelling fishes found on the continental slopes of the Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific Oceans, at depths to at least 2,460 m (8,070 ft). Of the two genera in the family, Chaunacops typically occurs at deeper depths than Chaunax, but with considerable overlap.

 src= Chaunax pictus

They have large, globose bodies and short, compressed tails, and are covered with small, spiny scales. The largest are about 30 cm (12 in) in length. The first dorsal fin ray is modified into a short bioluminescent lure which dangles forward over the mouth, which is turned upwards so as to be nearly vertical. The sensory canals of the lateral lines are especially conspicuous. Chaunax have modified fins which resemble legs.

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Distribution

provided by World Register of Marine Species
Distribution: Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific Oceans. With large balloon-shaped flabby inflatable bodies; the rough louse skin is covered with small spine-like scales. The mouth is large and nearly vertical with small teeths in bands on the jaws, vomer, and palatines. First dorsal spine bearing a bait or esca that fits into a scaleless U-shaped depression (illicial cavity) on the snout; second and third dorsal spines invisibly embedded behind first; 10-12 dorsal soft rays; anal fin with 5-7 rays; pelvics with 1 spine and 4 soft-rays; pectorals arm-like. Gill opening behind and above pectoral fin base. Lateral lines are open canals especially conspicious on the head, protected by enlarged spiny scales on either side of the canal. Species inhabit continental slopes in all oceans.
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bibliographic citation
MASDEA (1997).
i18n: Contributor
Edward Vanden Berghe [email]