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Ochodaeidae

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Ochodaeidae, also known as the sand-loving scarab beetles,[1] is a small family of scarabaeiform beetles occurring in many parts of the world.[2]

These beetles are small, ranging from 3–10 millimetres (0.12–0.39 in). Their bodies are elongate and convex, with black and brown colors including yellowish- and reddish-brown shades.[2]

As of 2012, the biology and habits of Ochodaeidae beetles is still mostly unknown. Most types have been collected in sandy areas at night, while some of their species are active during the day.[2]

Taxonomy

Ochodaeidae beetles belong to the infraorder Scarabaeiformia, which contains only one superfamily, the Scarabaeoidea.[3] The most striking feature of the Scarabaeoidea are the ends of their antennae, that are divided into several lamellae, thus resembling a fan. Another distinguishing feature are their legs, that possess teeth and are adapted for digging.[4]

Ochodaeidae is divided into two subfamilies containing five tribes and 15 genera:[5][6]

Enodognathus Benderitter, 1921
Odontochodaeus Paulian, 1976
Codocera Eschscholtz, 1818
Cucochodaeus Paulsen, 2007
Neochodaeus Nikolayev, 1995
Notochodaeus Nikolajev, 2005
Ochodaeus Dejean, 1821
Parochodaeus Nikolayev, 1995
Xenochodaeus Paulsen, 2007
Chaetocanthus Péringuey, 1901
Mioochodaeus Nikolajev, 1995
Namibiotalpa Scholtz & Evans, 1987
Pseudochodaeus Carlson & Richter, 1974
Synochodaeus Kolbe, 1907
Gauchodaeus Paulsen, 2012[6]

References

  1. ^ Zicha, Ondřej (2014). Ondřej Zicha; Jaroslav Hrb; Michal Maňas; et al. (eds.). "Family sand-loving scarab beetles Ochodaeidae Mulsant & Rey, 1871. Taxon profile". BioLib. Archived from the original on 26 August 2015. Retrieved 26 August 2015.
  2. ^ a b c Carlson, D.C.; Paulsen, M.J. (2012). University of Nebraska State Museum - Division of Entomology (ed.). "Ochodaeidae Mulsant & Rey, 1871 - Ochodaeid scarab beetles". Generic guide to New World Scarab Beetles. Archived from the original on 26 September 2013. Retrieved 26 August 2015.
  3. ^ Zicha, Ondřej (2006). Ondřej Zicha; Jaroslav Hrb; Michal Maňas; et al. (eds.). "Superfamily Scarabaeoidea. Taxon profile". BioLib. Archived from the original on 14 March 2007. Retrieved 27 August 2015.
  4. ^ Browne, D. Jonathan; Scholtz, Clarke H. (1995). "Scarabaeiformia. Scarabaeoidea. Scarabs, stag beetles, dung beetles, rain beetles, etc". Tree of Life Project. Archived from the original on 21 September 2013. Retrieved 27 August 2015.
  5. ^ Ondřej Zicha; Jaroslav Hrb; Michal Maňas; et al. (eds.). "BioLib". Archived from the original on 26 August 2015. Retrieved 27 August 2015.
  6. ^ a b Paulsen, M.J.; Ocampo, F.C. (2012). "The Ochodaeidae of Argentina (Coleoptera, Scarabaeoidea)". ZooKeys. Sofia: Pensoft. 174: 7–30. doi:10.3897/zookeys.174.2668. ISSN 1313-2970. PMC 3307351. PMID 22451781. Retrieved 27 August 2015.
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Ochodaeidae: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Ochodaeidae, also known as the sand-loving scarab beetles, is a small family of scarabaeiform beetles occurring in many parts of the world.

These beetles are small, ranging from 3–10 millimetres (0.12–0.39 in). Their bodies are elongate and convex, with black and brown colors including yellowish- and reddish-brown shades.

As of 2012, the biology and habits of Ochodaeidae beetles is still mostly unknown. Most types have been collected in sandy areas at night, while some of their species are active during the day.

license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
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wikipedia EN