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Brief Summary

    Phlomis russeliana: Brief Summary
    provided by wikipedia

    Phlomis russeliana, Turkish sage, is a species of flowering plant in the mint family Lamiaceae, native to Turkey and Syria in south west Asia. It is often confused with the closely related P. samia, and wrongly marketed as Phlomis viscosa. Growing to 1 m (3.3 ft) tall, it is a herbaceous perennial with hairy, erect stems. The textured, grey-green, sage-like leaves are arrow shaped, and point downwards. In summer, whorls of green buds develop in the leaf axils at regular intervals up each vertical stem, giving a distinctive tiered effect. The buds open to globose clusters of dull yellow hooded flowers.

    Phlomis russeliana is cultivated as an ornamental garden flower, in moist soil in full sun. It is hardy in all temperate zones down to −20 °C (−4 °F). The flowers are long-lasting, the dried flower-heads providing architectural interest throughout the winter months, as well as multiple seeds for propagation in the early spring. It has been given the Royal Horticultural Society’s Award of Garden Merit.

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Comprehensive Description

    Phlomis russeliana
    provided by wikipedia

    Phlomis russeliana, Turkish sage, is a species of flowering plant in the mint family Lamiaceae, native to Turkey and Syria in south west Asia. It is often confused with the closely related P. samia,[2] and wrongly marketed as Phlomis viscosa.[3] Growing to 1 m (3.3 ft) tall, it is a herbaceous perennial with hairy, erect stems. The textured, grey-green, sage-like leaves are arrow shaped, and point downwards. In summer, whorls of green buds develop in the leaf axils at regular intervals up each vertical stem, giving a distinctive tiered effect. The buds open to globose clusters of dull yellow hooded flowers.[4]

    Phlomis russeliana is cultivated as an ornamental garden flower, in moist soil in full sun. It is hardy in all temperate zones down to −20 °C (−4 °F). The flowers are long-lasting, the dried flower-heads providing architectural interest throughout the winter months, as well as multiple seeds for propagation in the early spring.[5] It has been given the Royal Horticultural Society’s Award of Garden Merit.[4]

    References

    1. ^ a b "Phlomis russeliana (Sims) Lag. ex Benth". The Plant List. Retrieved 25 April 2018..mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output q{quotes:"""""'"'"}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-free a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-registration a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}
    2. ^ Brickell, Christopher, ed. (2008). The Royal Horticultural Society A-Z Encyclopedia of Garden Plants. United Kingdom: Dorling Kindersley. p. 803. ISBN 9781405332965.
    3. ^ "Phlomis russeliana (Sims) Lag. ex Benth". Kew Science - Plants of the World Online. Retrieved 25 April 2018.
    4. ^ a b "RHS Plantfinder - Phlomis russeliana". Retrieved 25 April 2018.
    5. ^ "Propagating Phlomis russeliana". The Hardy Plant Society. Retrieved 25 April 2018.
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