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Emmelichthyidae
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The Emmelichthyidae are a family of small to medium-sized marine fish known commonly as rovers.[2] The family was once much larger, including a wide range of plankton-eating fish, but most of the genera were discovered to be unrelated examples of parallel evolution, and were moved to other families.[3]

The rovers are distributed in tropical and warmer temperate waters in the Indo-Pacific, southern Pacific, eastern Atlantic, and Caribbean Sea.[4]

These fish have protrusible, toothless or nearly toothless jaws, long dorsal fins, and forked tail fins with lobes that fold in like scissors. The largest species reach about 50 centimeters in length.[4]

See also

References

  1. ^ Froese, Rainer, and Daniel Pauly, eds. (2013). "Emmelichthyidae" in FishBase. April 2013 version.
  2. ^ Heemstra, PC; Randall, JE (1977). "A revision of the Emmelichthyidae (Pisces : Perciformes)". Marine and Freshwater Research. 28 (3): 361. doi:10.1071/MF9770361. ISSN 1323-1650..mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output q{quotes:"""""'"'"}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-free a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-registration a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}
  3. ^ Johnson, G.D.; Gill, A.C. (1998). Paxton, J.R.; Eschmeyer, W.N., eds. Encyclopedia of Fishes. San Diego: Academic Press. p. 184. ISBN 0-12-547665-5.
  4. ^ a b WoRMS (2014). Emmelichthyidae. In: Froese, R. and D. Pauly, Editors. FishBase. Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species.


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Emmelichthyidae: Brief Summary
provided by wikipedia EN

The Emmelichthyidae are a family of small to medium-sized marine fish known commonly as rovers. The family was once much larger, including a wide range of plankton-eating fish, but most of the genera were discovered to be unrelated examples of parallel evolution, and were moved to other families.

The rovers are distributed in tropical and warmer temperate waters in the Indo-Pacific, southern Pacific, eastern Atlantic, and Caribbean Sea.

These fish have protrusible, toothless or nearly toothless jaws, long dorsal fins, and forked tail fins with lobes that fold in like scissors. The largest species reach about 50 centimeters in length.

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Description
provided by World Register of Marine Species
Marine. Chiefly tropical to warm temperate in the Indo-Pacific, southern Pacific, eastern Atlantic, and Carribean Sea. Jaws highly protrusible; toothless or nearly so. Maxilla scaly, expanded distally; not covered by preorbital bone with the mouth closed. Well-developed supramaxilla. Large rostral cartilage. Dorsal fin continuous with a slight or deep notch reaching to base, or separated into spinous and soft-rayed portions with isolated short spines in between. Spines in dorsal fin 11-14; soft rays 9-12. Three spines in anal fin; soft rays 9-11. Forked caudal fin, the lobes folding in like scissors. Branchiostegal rays 7. Vertebrae 24 (10 + 14). To 50 cm maximum length. Depth range of adults 100-400 m, usually demersal.
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MASDEA (1997).
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Edward Vanden Berghe [email]
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WoRMS:note:80206