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Gempylidae

provided by wikipedia EN

The Gempylidae are a family of perciform fishes, commonly known as snake mackerels or escolars. The family includes about 25 species.

They are elongated fishes with a similar appearance to barracudas, having a long dorsal fin, usually with one or finlets trailing it. The largest species, including the snoek, Thyrsites atun, grow up to 2 m long. Like the barracudas, they are predators, with fang-like teeth.[2]

They are deep-water benthopelagic fishes, and several species are important commercial and game fishes.

Timeline

See also

References

  1. ^ Froese, Rainer, and Daniel Pauly, eds. (2013). "Gempylidae" in FishBase. April 2013 version.
  2. ^ Johnson, G.D.; Gill, A.C. (1998). Paxton, J.R.; Eschmeyer, W.N. (eds.). Encyclopedia of Fishes. San Diego: Academic Press. p. 190. ISBN 0-12-547665-5.
  3. ^ Danilʹchenko, P. G. 1967 Bony fishes of the Maikop deposits of the Caucasus
  4. ^ Bannikov, ALEXANDRE F. "A new genus and species of putative euzaphlegid fish from the Eocene of Bolca in norther Italy (Periformes, Trichiuroidea)." Studi e Ricerche sui giacimenti Terziari di Bolca, XII Miscellanea Paleontologica 9 (2008): 99-107. [1]
  5. ^ David, Lore Rose. January 10, 1943. Miocene Fishes of Southern California The Society p 104-115

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Gempylidae: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

The Gempylidae are a family of perciform fishes, commonly known as snake mackerels or escolars. The family includes about 25 species.

They are elongated fishes with a similar appearance to barracudas, having a long dorsal fin, usually with one or finlets trailing it. The largest species, including the snoek, Thyrsites atun, grow up to 2 m long. Like the barracudas, they are predators, with fang-like teeth.

They are deep-water benthopelagic fishes, and several species are important commercial and game fishes.

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Description

provided by World Register of Marine Species
Usually found in very deep waters. Distribution: tropical and subtropical seas. Body elongate; compressed. Exposed maxilla. Usually with isolated finlets after anal and dorsal fins. Pectoral fin inserted low on body. Pelvic fins lacking or very small. Caudal fin present.
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bibliographic citation
MASDEA (1997).
Contributor
Edward Vanden Berghe [email]