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Bothidae

provided by wikipedia EN

Lefteye flounders are a family, Bothidae, of flounders. They are called "lefteye flounders" because most species lie on the sea bottom on their right sides, with both eyes on their left sides. A helpful reminder when trying to recall the family name for this fish is that "Bothidae (Both o' dey) eyes are on the same side o' dey head."[1] The family is also distinguished by the presence of spines on the snout and near the eyes.[2]

Lefteye flounders vary considerably in size between the more than 160 species, ranging from 4.5 cm (1.8 in) to 1.5 m (4.9 ft) in length. They include such economically important species as the Japanese halibut.[2]

See also

References

  1. ^ Froese, Rainer, and Daniel Pauly, eds. (2006). "Bothidae" in FishBase. February 2006 version.
  2. ^ a b Chapleau, Francois & Amaoka, Kunio (1998). Paxton, J.R. & Eschmeyer, W.N., eds. Encyclopedia of Fishes. San Diego: Academic Press. pp. 224–225. ISBN 0-12-547665-5..mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output q{quotes:"""""'"'"}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-free a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-registration a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}
Generally
larger
flatfishHalibutTrue (2 species)Other Plaice(4 species) TurbotTrue (1 species) Spiny (3 species)Other
Indonesian ocellated flounder


Three-eye flounder


Winter flounder


True turbot
Generally
smaller
flatfishSoleTrue
(135 species) American
(28 species) Tongue
(138 species)OtherOther
flounderLefteye
(158 species) Righteye
(101 species)
Large tooth
(115 species) Southern
(6 species)OtherMiscRelated
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Bothidae: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Lefteye flounders are a family, Bothidae, of flounders. They are called "lefteye flounders" because most species lie on the sea bottom on their right sides, with both eyes on their left sides. A helpful reminder when trying to recall the family name for this fish is that "Bothidae (Both o' dey) eyes are on the same side o' dey head." The family is also distinguished by the presence of spines on the snout and near the eyes.

Lefteye flounders vary considerably in size between the more than 160 species, ranging from 4.5 cm (1.8 in) to 1.5 m (4.9 ft) in length. They include such economically important species as the Japanese halibut.

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Scaldfish (Arnoglossus laterna) larva

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Wide-eyed flounder, Bothus podas

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Laeops macrophthalmus

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Monolene atrimana

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Deepwater flounder, Monolene sessilicauda

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Sash flounder, Trichopsetta ventralis

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Description

provided by World Register of Marine Species
Distribution: tropical and temperate Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific oceans. Both eyes on left side in most species. Preopercle margin free and distinct. No spines in fins. Dorsal fin origin above or anterior to upper eye. Dorsal and anal fins separate from caudal fin. Branchiostegal membranes united. Anus on blind side. Egg yolk with a single oil globule. Lefteye flounders are found in all tropical and temperate seas, and several species are of commercial importance.
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WoRMS Editorial Board
bibliographic citation
MASDEA (1997).
i18n: Contributor
Edward Vanden Berghe [email]