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Paralichthyidae

provided by wikipedia EN

Large-tooth flounders or sand flounders are a family, Paralichthyidae, of flounders.[1][2] The family contains 14 genera with a total of about 110 species. They lie on the sea bed on their right side; both eyes are always on the left side of the head, while the Pleuronectidae usually (but not always) have their eyes on the right side of the head.

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Bigeye flounder, Hippoglossina macrops

They are found in temperate and tropical waters of the Atlantic, Indian and Pacific Oceans.[3]

"
Dusky flounder, Syacium papillosum

Several species are important commercial and game fishes, notably the California halibut, Paralichthys californicus and the Pacific sanddab, Citharichthys sordidus.

References

  1. ^ a b Froese, Rainer, and Daniel Pauly, eds. (2012). "Paralichthyidae" in FishBase. October 2012 version.
  2. ^ Kells, V.; and Carpenter, K. (2011). A Field Guide to Coastal Fishes from Maine to Texas. ISBN 978-0-8018-9838-9
  3. ^ "Paralichthyidae" World Register of Marine Species. Retrieved 2014-1-26.
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Paralichthyidae: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Large-tooth flounders or sand flounders are a family, Paralichthyidae, of flounders. The family contains 14 genera with a total of about 110 species. They lie on the sea bed on their right side; both eyes are always on the left side of the head, while the Pleuronectidae usually (but not always) have their eyes on the right side of the head.

" Bigeye flounder, Hippoglossina macrops

They are found in temperate and tropical waters of the Atlantic, Indian and Pacific Oceans.

" Dusky flounder, Syacium papillosum

Several species are important commercial and game fishes, notably the California halibut, Paralichthys californicus and the Pacific sanddab, Citharichthys sordidus.

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cc-by-sa-3.0
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Wikipedia authors and editors
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Description

provided by World Register of Marine Species
Atlantic, Indian and Pacific Oceans; marine, rarely in freshwater. Eyes on the left side. No spines in pectoral and pelvic fins; pelvic fin bases short and nearly symmetrical. Eggs with a single oil globule in the yolk. Placement of Tephrinectes and Thysanopsetta into this family is only provisional.
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bibliographic citation
MASDEA (1997).
Contributor
Edward Vanden Berghe [email]