dcsimg

Behavior

provided by Animal Diversity Web

Perception Channels: tactile ; chemical

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Dewey, T. . "Cottidae" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Cottidae.html
editor
Tanya Dewey, Animal Diversity Web
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Morphology

provided by Animal Diversity Web

Other Physical Features: bilateral symmetry

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Dewey, T. . "Cottidae" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Cottidae.html
editor
Tanya Dewey, Animal Diversity Web
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Abyssocottidae

provided by wikipedia EN

The Abyssocottidae are a family of fishes in the superfamily Cottoidea, the sculpins. They are known commonly as the deep-water sculpins.[1] The entire family is endemic to Lake Baikal in Siberia.[3]

Sculpins of this family mostly live in deep water, below 170 m (560 ft).[1] There are 24 known species in seven genera.[1][2] These include, for instance, Abyssocottus korotneffi and Cottinella boulengeri which are among the deepest-living freshwater fish.[4] Baikal is the deepest lake on Earth (1,642 m or 5,387 ft) and sculpins occupy even its greatest depths.[3]

Evolution and systematics

Molecular studies based on mitochondrial DNA suggest that the Abyssocottidae along with other Lake Baikal cottoid fishes, now attributed to the likewise endemic Cottocomephoridae (Baikal sculpins) and Comephoridae (Baikal oilfish), together make a monophyletic group that has originated and diversified within the lake relative recently, since the Pliocene. The ancestors of this species flock comprising more than 30 species belonged to the widespread freshwater sculpin genus Cottus (in Cottidae). The Abyssocottidae itself appears as a natural group within this radiation, except that also the genus Batrachocottus should be included.[5]

References

  1. ^ a b c d Froese, R. and D. Pauly. (Eds.) Abyssocottidae. FishBase. 2011.
  2. ^ a b Abyssocottidae. Integrated Taxonomic Information System (ITIS).
  3. ^ a b Hunt, D. M., et al. (1997). Molecular evolution of the cottoid fish endemic to Lake Baikal deduced from nuclear DNA evidence. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 8(3), 415-22.
  4. ^ Jakubowski, M. (1997). Morphometry of gill respiratory area in the Baikalian deep-water sculpins Abyssocottus korotneffi and Cottinella boulengeri (Abyssocottidae, Cottoidei). Journal of Morphology 233(2), 105-12.
  5. ^ Tytti Kontula, Sergei V. Kirilchik, Risto Väinölä (2003) Endemic diversification of the monophyletic cottoid fish species flock in Lake Baikal explored with mtDNA sequencing Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 27, 1, 143–155.
"
license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN

Abyssocottidae: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

The Abyssocottidae are a family of fishes in the superfamily Cottoidea, the sculpins. They are known commonly as the deep-water sculpins. The entire family is endemic to Lake Baikal in Siberia.

Sculpins of this family mostly live in deep water, below 170 m (560 ft). There are 24 known species in seven genera. These include, for instance, Abyssocottus korotneffi and Cottinella boulengeri which are among the deepest-living freshwater fish. Baikal is the deepest lake on Earth (1,642 m or 5,387 ft) and sculpins occupy even its greatest depths.

license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN

Cottidae

provided by wikipedia EN

The Cottidae are a family of fish in the superfamily Cottoidea, the sculpins. It is the largest sculpin family, with about 275 species in 70 genera.[1] They are referred to simply as cottids to avoid confusion with sculpins of other families.[1]

Cottids are distributed worldwide, especially in boreal and colder temperate climates.[1] The center of diversity is the northern Pacific Ocean.[1] Species occupy many types of aquatic habitats, including marine and fresh waters, and deep and shallow zones. A large number occur in near-shore marine habitat types, such as kelp forests and shallow reefs. They can be found in estuaries and in bodies of fresh water.[1]

Most cottids are small fish, under 10 cm (3.9 in) in length.[2] The species Scorpaenichthys marmoratus can be up to 78 cm (31 in) in length.[3] They vary in coloration and patterning between species and between individuals of some species, and sometimes between sexes.[1] Their eyes are large and placed high on the head. Adults lack swim bladders.[3]

Genera

The genera of the family include:[4]

Timeline

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f Kane, E. A. and T. E. Higham. (2012). Life in the flow lane: differences in pectoral fin morphology suggest transitions in station-holding demand across species of marine sculpin. Zoology (Jena) 115(4), 223-32.
  2. ^ Eschmeyer, W. N. (1998). Paxton, J. R. and W. N. Eschmeyer. (ed.). Encyclopedia of Fishes. San Diego: Academic Press. pp. 178–79. ISBN 0-12-547665-5.
  3. ^ a b Froese, R. and D. Pauly. (Eds.) Cottidae. FishBase. 2011.
  4. ^ Cottidae. Integrated Taxonomic Information System (ITIS).
  5. ^ Tokranov, AM; Orlov, AM; Sheiko, BA (2003). "Brief review of the genera Hemilepidotus and Melletes (Cottidae) and some traits of the biology of a new species for Russia Hemilepidotus zapus from Pacific waters of the northern Kurils". Journal of Ichthyology. 43 (3): 333–49.
"
license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN

Cottidae: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

The Cottidae are a family of fish in the superfamily Cottoidea, the sculpins. It is the largest sculpin family, with about 275 species in 70 genera. They are referred to simply as cottids to avoid confusion with sculpins of other families.

Cottids are distributed worldwide, especially in boreal and colder temperate climates. The center of diversity is the northern Pacific Ocean. Species occupy many types of aquatic habitats, including marine and fresh waters, and deep and shallow zones. A large number occur in near-shore marine habitat types, such as kelp forests and shallow reefs. They can be found in estuaries and in bodies of fresh water.

Most cottids are small fish, under 10 cm (3.9 in) in length. The species Scorpaenichthys marmoratus can be up to 78 cm (31 in) in length. They vary in coloration and patterning between species and between individuals of some species, and sometimes between sexes. Their eyes are large and placed high on the head. Adults lack swim bladders.

license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN

Cottocomephoridae

provided by wikipedia EN

Cottocomephoridae, or the bighead sculpins or Baikal sculpins, are a family of scorpaeniform fishes mostly endemic to Russia (one species ranges into Mongolia) where they are mostly found in Lake Baikal and surrounding lakes and rivers.[1]

The Catalog of Fishes does not recognize Cottocomephoridae as a separate family, but includes its members in the Cottidae.[2]

Members of Cottocomephoridae form a major part of the diet of the Baikal seal, especially in the autumn.[3]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Froese, Rainer, and Daniel Pauly, eds. (2012). "Cottocomephoridae" in FishBase. December 2012 version.
  2. ^ WN Eschmeyer, JD Fong (2015) Species by family/subfamily in the Catalog of Fishes California Academy of Sciences (15 Feb 2015)
  3. ^ "Baikal seal". baikal.ru. Retrieved 7 June 2017.
"
license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN

Cottocomephoridae: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Cottocomephoridae, or the bighead sculpins or Baikal sculpins, are a family of scorpaeniform fishes mostly endemic to Russia (one species ranges into Mongolia) where they are mostly found in Lake Baikal and surrounding lakes and rivers.

The Catalog of Fishes does not recognize Cottocomephoridae as a separate family, but includes its members in the Cottidae.

Members of Cottocomephoridae form a major part of the diet of the Baikal seal, especially in the autumn.

license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN