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Bagridae
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The Bagridae are a family of catfish that are native to Africa (Bagrus) and Asia (all other genera) from Japan to Borneo.[3] It includes about 245 species. These fish are commonly known as naked catfishes or bagrid catfishes.

Large bagrids are important as food fish. Some species are kept as aquarium fishes.[3]

Physical characteristics

The dorsal fin is preceded by a spine. The adipose fin is present and can have a relatively long base in some species. The pectoral fin spine can be serrated. The body is completely naked (they have no scales). The maximum length is about 1.5 m (4.9 ft).[3] Fishes of the family Bagridae have four pairs of well-developed barbels covered by a layer of taste bud-enriched epithelium.[4]

Taxonomy

The taxonomy of this family has changed rapidly. Nelson (2006) comments how "the family is very different from that recognized in Nelson (1994)". Claroteidae and Austroglanididae contain species that were previously bagrids. Auchenoglanididae is considered by some sources to be a subfamily of Claroteidae and by others to be its own family, sister to Heptapteridae. In addition some authorities place the genus Horabagrus in the family Horabagridae[5] together with two genera which are currently normally regarded as being in the Schilbeidae.[6]

It is unclear whether or not the family is monophyletic, and what its relationship to other catfishes might be.[3]

References

  1. ^ Ferraris, C.J.Jr. (2007). "Checklist of catfishes, recent and fossil (Osteichthyes: Siluriformes), and catalogue of siluriform primary types" (PDF). Zootaxa. 1418: 1–628..mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output q{quotes:"""""'"'"}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-free a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-registration a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}
  2. ^ Ng H.H.; Hadiaty R.K.; Lundberg J.G.; Luckenbill K.R. (2015). "A new genus and species of bagrid catfish from northern Sumatra (Siluriformes: Bagridae)". Proceedings of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia. 164 (1): 149–157. doi:10.1635/053.164.0112.
  3. ^ a b c d Nelson, J.S. (2006). Fishes of the World. John Wiley & Sons, Inc. ISBN 0-471-25031-7.
  4. ^ Zhang, G.-H.; Deng, S.-P.; Zhang, H.-Y.; Li, H.-T. & Li, L.-L. (2006). "Distribution of different taste buds and expression of a-gustducin in the barbells of yellow catfish (Pelteobagrus fulvidraco)". Fish Physiology and Biochemistry. 32 (1): 55–62. doi:10.1007/s10695-006-6937-z. PMID 20035479.
  5. ^ Hofreiter, Michael; Wang, Jing; Lu, Bin; Zan, Ruiguang; Chai, Jing; Ma, Wei; Jin, Wei; Duan, Rongyao; Luo, Jing; Murphy, Robert W.; Xiao, Heng; Chen, Ziming (2016). "Phylogenetic relationships of five Asian schilbid genera including Clupisoma (Siluriformes: Schilbeidae)". PLoS ONE. 11 (1): e0145675. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0145675. PMC 4713424. PMID 26751688.
  6. ^ "Catalogue of Fishes". California Academy of Sciences. Retrieved 9 August 2017.


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Bagridae: Brief Summary
provided by wikipedia EN

The Bagridae are a family of catfish that are native to Africa (Bagrus) and Asia (all other genera) from Japan to Borneo. It includes about 245 species. These fish are commonly known as naked catfishes or bagrid catfishes.

Large bagrids are important as food fish. Some species are kept as aquarium fishes.

license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
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wikipedia EN
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4c27aca7bfbda8dad7e4ca3a32e4ea3c