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Eeltail catfish
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For the species Tandanus tandanus, see Eel-tailed catfish.

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Striped eel catfish, Plotosus lineatus

The eeltail catfish are a family (Plotosidae) of catfish whose tails are elongated in an eel-like fashion. These catfishes are native to the Indian Ocean and western Pacific from Japan to Australia and Fiji.[1] The family includes about 41 species in 10 genera.[1][2] About half of the species are freshwater, occurring in Australia and New Guinea.[1]

These fish have eel-like bodies. Their tails are pointed or bluntly rounded. Most species have four pairs of barbels. The adipose fin is absent. The tail fin is formed by the joining of the second dorsal fin, the caudal fin, and the anal fin, forming a single, continuous fin.[1]

Some of these catfishes can inflict painful wounds; stings from Plotosus lineatus may result in death.[1] They are bottom feeders and use the barbels around their mouths to detect food.[3]

References

  1. ^ a b c d e Nelson, Joseph S. (2006). Fishes of the World. John Wiley & Sons, Inc. ISBN 0-471-25031-7..mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output q{quotes:"""""'"'"}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-free a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-registration a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}
  2. ^ Ferraris, Carl J., Jr. (2007). "Checklist of catfishes, recent and fossil (Osteichthyes: Siluriformes), and catalogue of siluriform primary types" (PDF). Zootaxa. 1418: 1–628. Retrieved 2009-06-23.
  3. ^ Froese, Rainer, and Daniel Pauly, eds. (2007). "Plotosidae" in FishBase. Aug 2007 version.
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Eeltail catfish: Brief Summary
provided by wikipedia EN
For the species Tandanus tandanus, see Eel-tailed catfish.

 src= Striped eel catfish, Plotosus lineatus

The eeltail catfish are a family (Plotosidae) of catfish whose tails are elongated in an eel-like fashion. These catfishes are native to the Indian Ocean and western Pacific from Japan to Australia and Fiji. The family includes about 41 species in 10 genera. About half of the species are freshwater, occurring in Australia and New Guinea.

These fish have eel-like bodies. Their tails are pointed or bluntly rounded. Most species have four pairs of barbels. The adipose fin is absent. The tail fin is formed by the joining of the second dorsal fin, the caudal fin, and the anal fin, forming a single, continuous fin.

Some of these catfishes can inflict painful wounds; stings from Plotosus lineatus may result in death. They are bottom feeders and use the barbels around their mouths to detect food.

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78b0d15aaf4f2b305b12ce14ae463838
Distribution
provided by World Register of Marine Species
Indian Ocean and western Pacific from Japan to Australia. Anguilliform. Caudal pointed or bluntly rounded. Barbels usually 4 pairs. Adipose fin absent. Caudal fin rays may be far advanced along dorsal. Lower procurrent caudal rays confluent with long anal fin. Branchiostegal rays 7-14. Some can cause painful injury. Marine species = ISSCAAP 39; freshwater species = ISSCAAP 13.
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MASDEA (1997).
i18n: Contributor
Edward Vanden Berghe [email]
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WoRMS:note:80148