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Comments
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Dianthus chinensis is a very variable species represented in China by both cultivated and wild plants. In FRPS, the species was divided into eight varieties (treated in synonymy here), all of them occurring as wild plants and var. chinensis also including the cultivated material. No key to the varieties was provided, and the features given in the diagnoses were not always parallel, making it almost impossible to identify any given plant to variety. Moreover, the plants cultivated as ornamentals comprise numerous cultivars. Further research is needed on the species in China and surrounding countries before a satisfactory infraspecific classification can be presented. In the present account, therefore, Dianthus chinensis is treated in the broadest sense.

The species is used medicinally.

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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 6: 104 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Flora of China @ eFloras.org
editor
Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
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eFloras.org
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ID
26481
Description
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Herbs perennial, 30--50 cm tall, glabrous. Stems laxly caespitose, erect, distally branched. Leaves linear-lanceolate, 3--5 cm × 2--4 mm, midvein prominent, base slightly narrowed, margin entire or denticulate, apex acuminate. Flowers solitary or several in cymes; pedicel 1--3 cm; bracts 4, ovate, ca. 1/2 as long as calyx, margin membranous, ciliate, apex long acuminate. Calyx cylindric, 1.5--2.5 cm × 0.4--5 mm, striate; teeth lanceolate, ca. 5 mm, margin ciliate, apex sharply pointed. Petals 1.6--1.8 cm; limb bright red, purple-red, pink, or white, obovate-triangular, 1.3--1.5 cm, throat spotted and laxly bearded, apex irregularly toothed. Stamens exserted; anthers blue. Ovary suboblong. Styles linear. Capsule cylindric, surrounded by calyx, apex 4-toothed. Seeds black, compressed globose. Fl. May--Jun, fr. Jul--Sep. 2n = 30*.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 6: 104 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of China @ eFloras.org
editor
Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
project
eFloras.org
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eFloras
ID
26480
Distribution
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China, often cultivated in India and Japan.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Annotated Checklist of the Flowering Plants of Nepal Vol. 0 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Annotated Checklist of the Flowering Plants of Nepal @ eFloras.org
author
K.K. Shrestha, J.R. Press and D.A. Sutton
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eFloras.org
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ID
138833
Elevation Range
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1200-1300 m
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Annotated Checklist of the Flowering Plants of Nepal Vol. 0 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Annotated Checklist of the Flowering Plants of Nepal @ eFloras.org
author
K.K. Shrestha, J.R. Press and D.A. Sutton
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eFloras.org
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ID
143975
Habitat & Distribution
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Sandy forest margins, forest grasslands, scrub on mountain slopes, hillside grasslands, dry hillsides, sandy hill summits, valleys, rocky ravines, meadows, streamsides, mountain stream wetlands, mountain waterfalls, rocks, steppes, steppe sands, fixed dunes, seashores, also widely cultivated. Native in Gansu, Hebei, Heilongjiang, Henan, Jilin, Liaoning, Nei Mongol, Ningxia, Qinghai, Shaanxi, Shandong, Shanxi, and Xinjiang; naturalized in S China [Kazakhstan, Korea, Mongolia, Russia (Siberia, Far East); Europe].
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 6: 104 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of China @ eFloras.org
editor
Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
project
eFloras.org
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eFloras
ID
26482
Synonym
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Dianthus amurensis Jacques; D. chinensis var. amurensis (Jacques) Kitagawa; D. chinensis var. dentosus (Fischer ex Reichenbach) Debeaux; D. chinensis f. ignescens (Nakai) Kitagawa; D. chinensis var. ignescens Nakai; D. chinensis var. jingpoensis G. Y. Zhang & X. Y. Yuan; D. chinensis var. liaotungensis Y. C. Chu; D. chinensis var. longisquama Nakai & Kitagawa; D. chinensis var. macrosepalus Franchet ex L. H. Bailey; D. chinensis var. morii (Nakai) Y. C. Chu; D. chinensis var. subulifolius (Kitagawa) Y. C. Ma; D. chinensis var. sylvaticus W. D. J. Koch; D. chinensis var. trinervis D. Q. Lu; D. chinensis subsp. versicolor (Fisher ex Link) Voroschilov; D. chinensis var. versicolor (Fisher ex Link) Y. C. Ma; D. dentosus Fischer ex Reichenbach; D. fischeri Sprengel; D. morii Nakai; D. sequieri Chaix; D. sequieri var. dentosus (Fischer ex Reichenbach) Franchet; D. subulifolius Kitagawa; D. subulifolius f. leucopetalus Kitagawa; D. versicolor Fisher ex Link; D. versicolor f. leucopetalus (Kitagawa) Y. C. Chu; D. versicolor var. subulifolius (Kitagawa) Y. C. Chu.
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cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 6: 104 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of China @ eFloras.org
editor
Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
project
eFloras.org
original
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eFloras
ID
26479
Dianthus chinensis
provided by wikipedia EN

Dianthus chinensis, commonly known as rainbow pink[1] or China pink (Chinese: 石竹 shi zhu) is a species of Dianthus native to northern China, Korea, Mongolia, and southeastern Russia.[2] It is a herbaceous perennial plant growing to 30–50 cm tall.

Description

The leaves are green to greyish green, slender, 3–5 cm long and 2–4 mm broad. The flowers are white, pink, or red, 3–4 cm diameter, produced singly or in small clusters from spring to mid summer.[2] Several branched stems form a loose eyrie. The basal leaves are usually already withered during flowering, the leaves remain on the stem.

Growing in the form of a bush, the flowers are often together in pairs, as ornamentals read varieties accommodate up to 15 flowers in a zymösen inflorescence forth. Below the flower stand four bracts, which reach to half of the calyx; they are ciliated and end up pointedly. The calyx forms a cylindrical, 1.5 to 2.5 cm long tube, the crown reaches 3 to 4 cm in diameter and is serrated at the edge. The color of the petals ranges from white to pink to dark red, the middle is often drawn darker. The capsule fruitis enclosed by the sepals. The black seeds are flattened-roundish.[3]

Distribution

The plant has a large distribution area in East Asia, which includes not only China, but also Korea and eastern Russia, to the northwest it still occurs in Mongolia and Kazakhstan. The Flora of China also counts Europe as the area of distribution. The sites include grasslands as well as sparse forests.

Cultivation

It is widely cultivated as an ornamental plant, both in China and elsewhere across temperate regions of the world; numerous cultivars have been selected for garden use.[4] Over the years, many forms have been derived from selection and hybridization. Today, the efforts of breeders are aimed at creating hybrids characterized by a compact bush, early and long flowering, flowers of various shades. This makes it possible to grow plants not only at the amateur level, but also for commercial purposes.[5]

Gallery

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    Botanical illustration

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    1858 illustration

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    Red flowers

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    Dianthus chinensis var. senperflorens

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    Pinkish white flowers

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    Imperials in a bush setting

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    Dianthus chinensis var. senperflorens

References

  1. ^ English Names for Korean Native Plants (PDF). Pocheon: Korea National Arboretum. 2015. p. 439. ISBN 978-89-97450-98-5. Retrieved 25 January 2016 – via Korea Forest Service..mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output q{quotes:"""""'"'"}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-free a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-registration a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}
  2. ^ a b Flora of China: Dianthus chinensis
  3. ^ Eckehart J. Jäger, Friedrich Ebel, Peter Hanelt, Gerd K. Mueller (ed.): Excursion flora of Germany . Volume 5 . Herbaceous ornamental and useful plants. Springer, Berlin Heidelberg 2008, ISBN 978-3-8274-0918-8 , p 190 .
  4. ^ Huxley, A., ed. (1992). New RHS Dictionary of Gardening. Macmillan ISBN 0-333-47494-5.
  5. ^ Huxley, A., ed. (1992). New RHS Dictionary of Gardening . Macmillan ISBN 0-333-47494-5 .
 src= Wikimedia Commons has media related to Dianthus chinensis.
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Dianthus chinensis: Brief Summary
provided by wikipedia EN

Dianthus chinensis, commonly known as rainbow pink or China pink (Chinese: 石竹 shi zhu) is a species of Dianthus native to northern China, Korea, Mongolia, and southeastern Russia. It is a herbaceous perennial plant growing to 30–50 cm tall.

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