dcsimg

Description

provided by eFloras
Shrubs to trees, 2-10 m tall; branchlets ferruginous pubescent, lenticellate. Leaf blade sessile, imparipinnately compound; rachis broadly winged to wingless, ferruginous pubescent; leaflets (5-)7-13; leaflet blade ovate to oblong, increasing in size toward apex, 6-12 × 3-7 cm, adaxially dark green, sparsely pubescent or glabrescent, abaxially lighter green, glaucous, and ferruginous pubescent, base rounded to cuneate in terminal leaflet, margin dentate, often crenate, apex acute, lateral veins and reticulate venation impressed adaxially and prominent abaxially. Inflorescence many branched, densely ferruginous pubescent, male ones 30-40 cm, female ones shorter. Pedicel ca. 1 mm, minutely pubescent; flowers white. Male flowers: calyx minutely pubescent, lobes long ovate, ca. 1 mm, with ciliate margins; petals obovate-oblong, ca. 2 mm; stamen filaments ca. 2 mm, anthers ovoid, ca. 0.7 mm; disk annular; ovary reduced to absent. Female flowers: calyx lobes ca. 0.6 mm; petals elliptic-ovate, ca. 1.6 mm; staminodes much reduced; disk annular; ovary ovoid, ca. 1 mm, densely white pubescent, styles 3, stigma capitate. Drupe globose, slightly compressed, 4-5 mm in diam., mixed pilose and glandular-pubescent, red at maturity. Fl. Aug-Sep, fr. Oct.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 11: 335, 346 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of China @ eFloras.org
editor
Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
project
eFloras.org
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eFloras

Distribution

provided by eFloras
Anhui, Fujian, Gansu, Guangdong, Guangxi, Guizhou, Hainan, Hebei, Henan, Hubei, Hunan, Jiangsu, Jiangxi, Ningxia, Qinghai, Shaanxi, Shandong, Shanxi, Sichuan, Taiwan, Xizang, Yunnan, Zhejiang [Bhutan, Cambodia, India, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Laos, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand, Vietnam].
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 11: 335, 346 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of China @ eFloras.org
editor
Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
project
eFloras.org
original
visit source
partner site
eFloras

Habitat

provided by eFloras
Lowland, hill, and mountain forests, forests along streams, thickets; 100-2800 m.
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 11: 335, 346 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of China @ eFloras.org
editor
Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
project
eFloras.org
original
visit source
partner site
eFloras

Rhus chinensis

provided by wikipedia EN

Rhus chinensis, the Chinese sumac,[1] or nutgall tree, is a plant species in the genus Rhus.

Galls produced on the species that are called Chinese gall, Galla Chinensis, or Wu Bei Zi (五倍子) in Chinese, are a source of gallotannins,[2][3] molecules of hydrolyzable tannins. Infestation of the tree by Chinese sumac aphids (Melaphis chinensis Bell) may lead to production of a gall that is valued as a commercial product in China.

Chinese galls are used in traditional Chinese medicine for coughs, diarrhea, night sweats, dysentery, and intestinal and uterine bleeding.[4] Some research has suggested that chemical compounds found in Rhus chinensis possess in vitro antiviral, antibacterial, anticancer, hepatoprotective, antidiarrheal, and antioxidant activities.[5] However, it is important to note that this evidence is not substantiated by multiple international researchers. The aqueous extracts of the gall also inhibit alpha-glucosidase activity in vitro.[6]

References

  1. ^ "Rhus chinensis". Natural Resources Conservation Service PLANTS Database. USDA. Retrieved 21 October 2015.
  2. ^ Tian, Fang; Li, Bo; Ji, Baoping; Zhang, Guizhi; Luo, Yangchao (2009). "Identification and structure–activity relationship of gallotannins separated from Galla chinensis". LWT - Food Science and Technology. 42 (7): 1289. doi:10.1016/j.lwt.2009.03.004.
  3. ^ Tian, Fang; Li, Bo; Ji, Baoping; Yang, Jinhua; Zhang, Guizhi; Chen, Yang; Luo, Yangchao (2009). "Antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of consecutive extracts from Galla chinensis:The polarity affects the bioactivities". Food Chemistry. 113: 173. doi:10.1016/j.foodchem.2008.07.062.
  4. ^ "Aphid", Henry G. Stroyan, McGraw-Hill Encyclopedia of Science & Technology, 8th Edition, 1997, ISBN 0-07-911504-7
  5. ^ Djakpo, O; Yao, W (2010). "Rhus chinensis and Galla Chinensis--folklore to modern evidence: Review". Phytotherapy Research. 24 (12): 1739–47. doi:10.1002/ptr.3215. PMID 20564459.
  6. ^ Shim, Y. J; Doo, H. K; Ahn, S. Y; Kim, Y. S; Seong, J. K; Park, I. S; Min, B. H (2003). "Inhibitory effect of aqueous extract from the gall of Rhus chinensis on alpha-glucosidase activity and postprandial blood glucose". Journal of Ethnopharmacology. 85 (2–3): 283–7. doi:10.1016/s0378-8741(02)00370-7. PMID 12639753.

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Rhus chinensis: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Rhus chinensis, the Chinese sumac, or nutgall tree, is a plant species in the genus Rhus.

Galls produced on the species that are called Chinese gall, Galla Chinensis, or Wu Bei Zi (五倍子) in Chinese, are a source of gallotannins, molecules of hydrolyzable tannins. Infestation of the tree by Chinese sumac aphids (Melaphis chinensis Bell) may lead to production of a gall that is valued as a commercial product in China.

Chinese galls are used in traditional Chinese medicine for coughs, diarrhea, night sweats, dysentery, and intestinal and uterine bleeding. Some research has suggested that chemical compounds found in Rhus chinensis possess in vitro antiviral, antibacterial, anticancer, hepatoprotective, antidiarrheal, and antioxidant activities. However, it is important to note that this evidence is not substantiated by multiple international researchers. The aqueous extracts of the gall also inhibit alpha-glucosidase activity in vitro.

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foliage

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flowers

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fruits

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sapling

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cc-by-sa-3.0
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Wikipedia authors and editors
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wikipedia EN