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Alexander's Rock Aster

Eurybia avita (Alexander) G. L. Nesom

Comments

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Eurybia avita is known from Stone Mountain (the type location, where it is now extirpated according to R. Kral 1983, vol. 2) and granite flatrocks in Georgia, and from Pickens County in South Carolina, where it is imperiled; it is presumed extirpated from North Carolina (www.natureserve.org). Kral mapped the species; he underlined its similarities to both E. surculosa and E. paludosa and the need for further studies of its relationships.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 20: 367,377, 378, 379 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
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Description

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Plants 30–50(–80) cm; in clumps, eglandular; rhizomes short, creeping, ± woody in age. Stems 1–5+, erect to ascending, simple, strict, slender, stiff, proximally glabrous or glabrate, distally hirtello-puberulent. Leaves basal and cauline, firm, blades (1-nerved) linear to lance-linear or oblong-linear (grasslike), 25–140+ × 2–5 mm, ± coriaceous, bases sheathing, margins entire to remotely serrulate-spinose, indurate, remotely scabrous, spines thickened, apices acute, revolute, faces glabrous; basal and proximal cauline often withering by flowering, bases marcescent, ± long-petiolate; mid and distal progressively sessile and reduced. Heads 3–15+ in narrow, flat-topped corymbiform arrays. Peduncles densely hirtellous; bracts 1–2, usually immediately subtending heads. Involucres cylindro-campanulate, 7–9 mm, shorter than pappi. Phyllaries 30–55+ in 4–5 series, unequal, chartaceous, bases indurate, margins narrowly hyaline, scabrous, erose, fimbriate, apices appressed or reflexed, acute, sometimes acuminate (some outer), mucronate, marginally thickened, faces glabrous; outer lance-oblong, rounded, apical zones dark green, flat; inner linear-oblong, apical zones pale green, restricted to broadly acute tips. Ray florets 8–20; corollas bluish white to lavender or deep violet, 5–10 × 1–1.7 mm. Disc florets 15–45; corollas yellow, 5.5–7 mm, barely ampliate, tubes shorter than narrowly funnelform throats, lobes erect, triangular, 0.6–0.7 mm. Cypselae tan, fusiform, ± compressed, ca. 5 mm, ribs 7–10(–12) (stramineous, broad), strigillose; pappi of cinnamon to sordid bristles 5.5–6 mm, equaling disc corollas. 2n = 18.
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cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 20: 367,377, 378, 379 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
editor
Flora of North America Editorial Committee
project
eFloras.org
original
visit source
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eFloras

Synonym

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Aster avitus Alexander, Castanea 4: 60. 1939
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 20: 367,377, 378, 379 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
editor
Flora of North America Editorial Committee
project
eFloras.org
original
visit source
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eFloras

Eurybia avita

provided by wikipedia EN

Eurybia avita, commonly called Alexander's rock aster, is a rare North American plant species, a herbaceous perennial in the composite family that was formerly considered part of the genus Aster. It is native to the southeastern United States.[3] It is of conservation concern as it is found in less than 50 sites, typically only in sandy soils near granite flatrocks, and it is most likely already extirpated in North Carolina. Its habitat is threatened by development and the recreational use of the area where it grows. It is very similar to both E. surculosa and E. paludosa and more research needs to be done to determine the exact relationship between the three species.[4]

Eurybia avita is a perennial herb sometimes as much as 80 cm (32 inches) tall, having 1-5 stems and reproducing by means of underground rhizomes. The flowers emerge in the late summer to early fall, the plant producing 3-15 or more flower heads in a flat-topped array. Each head contains 8–20 pale blue, purple, or violet ray florets and 15–45 yellow disc florets.[4]

Distribution and habitat

Eurybia avita is present only in the U.S. states of Georgia, South Carolina and North Carolina,[3] though it is probably extirpated from North Carolina. In South Carolina it is only known from one site in Pickens County, while in Georgia it can be found in 40 to 45 locations. In North Carolina there are currently no known populations. The type location was Stone Mountain, but that population no longer exists. It is typically found between 100 and 500 metre (350–2800 feet) (elevations growing in shallow and sandy soils around the edges of granite flatrock outcropings.[1][4]

References

  1. ^ a b NatureServe (2006), "Eurybia avita", NatureServe Explorer: An online encyclopedia of life, Version 6.1., Arlington, Virginia.mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output q{quotes:"""""'"'"}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-free a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-registration a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}
  2. ^ "Eurybia avita". The Global Compositae Checklist (GCC) – via The Plant List.
  3. ^ a b "Eurybia avita". County-level distribution map from the North American Plant Atlas (NAPA). Biota of North America Program (BONAP). 2014.
  4. ^ a b c Brouillet, Luc (2006). "Flora of North America". In Flora of North America Editorial Committee. Flora of North America North of Mexico (FNA). 20. New York and Oxford – via eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis, MO & Harvard University Herbaria, Cambridge, MA.
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Eurybia avita: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Eurybia avita, commonly called Alexander's rock aster, is a rare North American plant species, a herbaceous perennial in the composite family that was formerly considered part of the genus Aster. It is native to the southeastern United States. It is of conservation concern as it is found in less than 50 sites, typically only in sandy soils near granite flatrocks, and it is most likely already extirpated in North Carolina. Its habitat is threatened by development and the recreational use of the area where it grows. It is very similar to both E. surculosa and E. paludosa and more research needs to be done to determine the exact relationship between the three species.

Eurybia avita is a perennial herb sometimes as much as 80 cm (32 inches) tall, having 1-5 stems and reproducing by means of underground rhizomes. The flowers emerge in the late summer to early fall, the plant producing 3-15 or more flower heads in a flat-topped array. Each head contains 8–20 pale blue, purple, or violet ray florets and 15–45 yellow disc florets.

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