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I have followed Meikle (Fl.Cyprus, fined.) who has interpreted Alhagi maurorum Medic to be conspecific with Alhagi pseudalhagi (M.Bieb.) Desv. contrary to other workers who regarded it as nomen confusum.

Persian manna or Camel Thorn is used medicinally and as fodder for camels. Sometimes it is also used for making tatties in summer. Vern.: Janasa.

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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of Pakistan Vol. 0: 319 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Flora of Pakistan @ eFloras.org
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S. I. Ali & M. Qaiser
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eFloras.org
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Description

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Undershrub, 60-100 cm tall, glabrous or pubescent. Leaf simple, 10-25 mm long, 3-8 mm broad, obovate or elliptic-oblong, glabrous or pubescent, entire, apiculate; petiole c. 2 mm; stipules minute. Inflorescence lateral axillary racemes 1-5 cm long, ending in spine. Pedicel 1-3 mm, with 1-2 minute bracteoles. Calyx 2-2.5 mm, glabrous, teeth almost obsolete to triangular. Corolla 6-9 mm long, pink or reddish - violet. Fruit 19-34 mm long, 2-3mm dorab, glabrous, more or less constricted between the seeds, 1-9-seeded.
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of Pakistan Vol. 0: 319 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of Pakistan @ eFloras.org
editor
S. I. Ali & M. Qaiser
project
eFloras.org
original
visit source
partner site
eFloras

Distribution

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Distribution: Pakistan; Kashmir; Iran, Afghanistan; Russia, Turkey, Iraq, Syria, Palestine, Cyprus, N.Africa.
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cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of Pakistan Vol. 0: 319 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of Pakistan @ eFloras.org
editor
S. I. Ali & M. Qaiser
project
eFloras.org
original
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eFloras

Flower/Fruit

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Fl.Per.: April-September.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of Pakistan Vol. 0: 319 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of Pakistan @ eFloras.org
editor
S. I. Ali & M. Qaiser
project
eFloras.org
original
visit source
partner site
eFloras

Alhagi maurorum

provided by wikipedia EN

Alhagi maurorum is a species of legume commonly known, variously, as camelthorn,[1] camelthorn-bush,[1] Caspian manna,[1] and Persian mannaplant.[1] This shrub is native to the region extending from the Mediterranean to Russia, but has been introduced to many other areas of the world, including Australia, southern Africa, and the western United States. The perennial plant grows from a massive rhizome system which may extend over six feet into the ground. New shoots can appear over 20 feet from the parent plant. Above the ground, the plant rarely reaches four feet in height. It is a heavily branched, gray-green thicket with long spines along the branches. It bears small, bright pink to maroon pea flowers and small legume pods, which are brown or reddish and constricted between the seeds. The seeds are mottled brown beans.

Distribution

Alhagi maurorum is indigenous to temperate and tropical Eurasia and the Middle East, in: Afghanistan; Armenia; Azerbaijan; northwest China; Cyprus; northern India; Iran; Iraq; Israel; Jordan; Kazakhstan; Kuwait; Lebanon; Mongolia; Pakistan; Syria; Tajikistan; Turkey; Turkmenistan; Uzbekistan; and Russia (in Ciscaucasia, Dagestan, southern European Russia, and the southern part of the West Siberian Plain).[1]

A. maurorum has become naturalized in Australia and the southwest U.S..[1]

Uses

Alhagi maurorum has been used locally in folk medicine as a treatment for glandular tumors, nasal polyps, and ailments related to the bile ducts.[2] It is used as a medicinal herb for its gastroprotective, diaphoretic, diuretic, expectorant, laxative, antidiarrhoeal and antiseptic properties, and in the treatment of rheumatism and hemorrhoids. The plant is mentioned in the Qur’an as a source of sweet Manna. It has also been used as a sweetener.[1]

In the folk medicine of Iran, Alhagi maurorum decoction has been used for jaundice therapy.[3]

Ecology

Alhagi maurorum is a noxious weed outside its native range. It is a contaminant of alfalfa seed, and grows readily when accidentally introduced to a cultivated field. It has a wide soil tolerance, thriving on saline, sandy, rocky, and dry soils. It does best when growing next to a source of water, such as an irrigation ditch. It is unpalatable to animals and irritating when it invades forage and grazing land.

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i The name Alhagi maurorum, replacing Linnaeus' Hedysarum alhagi, was first published in Vorlesungen der Churpfälzischen physicalisch-ökonomischen Gesellschaft 2: 397. 1787. "Alhagi maurorum". Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN). Agricultural Research Service (ARS), United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). Retrieved November 13, 2011.
  2. ^ James A. Duke. "Alhagi maurorum (FABACEAE)". Dr. Duke's Phytochemical and Ethnobotanical Databases. Retrieved December 24, 2017.
  3. ^ Tewari D, Mocan A, Parvanov ED, Sah AN, Nabavi SM, Huminiecki L, Ma ZF, Lee YY, Horbańczuk JO, Atanasov AG (Aug 2017). "Ethnopharmacological Approaches for Therapy of Jaundice: Part I". Front Pharmacol. 8: 518. doi:10.3389/fphar.2017.00518. PMC 5559545. PMID 28860989.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)

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Alhagi maurorum: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Alhagi maurorum is a species of legume commonly known, variously, as camelthorn, camelthorn-bush, Caspian manna, and Persian mannaplant. This shrub is native to the region extending from the Mediterranean to Russia, but has been introduced to many other areas of the world, including Australia, southern Africa, and the western United States. The perennial plant grows from a massive rhizome system which may extend over six feet into the ground. New shoots can appear over 20 feet from the parent plant. Above the ground, the plant rarely reaches four feet in height. It is a heavily branched, gray-green thicket with long spines along the branches. It bears small, bright pink to maroon pea flowers and small legume pods, which are brown or reddish and constricted between the seeds. The seeds are mottled brown beans.

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Wikipedia authors and editors
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